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  • Priceless
    commented on 's reply
    I had to google Frank Watt, just a little before my time

  • TriBel
    commented on 's reply
    Don't get carried away. For some reason, I'm also thinking Frank Watt from Z-Cars! Regardless, that Vimes in the show isn't Pratchett's Vimes.

  • Priceless
    replied
    Did you ever see Robert Mitchum play Philip Marlowe? That's how I imagine Sam Vimes...with Alan Rickman as Lord Vetinari.
    Wow, I can't imagine the Vimes we get in The Watch as Robert Mitchum

    I don't mind 'love' being the answer as long as we get there in an interesting or funny way.

    Leave a comment:


  • TriBel
    replied
    Priceless
    Is 'love' the meaning of it all? If so, give me Douglass Adams every time and remove this humourless, grey, mediocre, empty nonsense.
    “And what would humans be without love?”
    RARE, said Death.” (Sourcery)

    No - TBH, I think "goodness" (but not "good") is the cure-all of Pratchett's world (though there isn't really a cure-all). I'm not sure he has much time for "luv". He's funny (laugh-out-loud funny) and very clever - which is why I only lasted 20 minutes with The Watch. Did you ever see Robert Mitchum play Philip Marlowe? That's how I imagine Sam Vimes...with Alan Rickman as Lord Vetinari.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    Priceless Honestly, I don't remember Wham being in it but from what I recall the dancing was just randomness. I don't remember thinking it was funny but a little odd/confusing. Actually one of the strangest moments, so I can understand you finding it so.

    The humour isn't anything like the books which can be farcical, satirical, often character based or situational humour. There is plenty of word play and they're full of clever touches. Much more like a fantasy version of Douglas Adams. The Watch uses a setting and characters created in a book series, but isn't following any of the book stories and the steampunk feel of the city is an alternate version of Ankh Morpork too. The characters likewise are different versions, with quite a few tweaks. Vimes in The Watch really doesn't feel like the Vimes of the books at all (the strange gurning is all 'The Watch'). The show really only is inspired by the source material.

    I came out of The Watch feeling like the point of it was this disparate group finding their place together, believing in each other and finding and believing in their own strengths. They go from not really doing much, behaving as if they are useless oddballs in society, held back by their insecurities, to becoming a functioning group looking to be heroes.

    I think it's watchable and I did enjoy it. But if you drop it (or even if you don't) please, please, please don't be put off any other true adaptations of Pratchett's Discworld books or be put off reading the books themselves. Aside from arguable the first two books (imo), all the ones I read are incredible. Even the best moments of The Watch don't come anywhere in the vicinity of close to the utter quality of Pratchett's Discworld.

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  • Priceless
    replied
    What really stumped me was everyone suddenly dancing to Wham. I assumed this was meant to be funny, with enemies who were a moment ago going to kill each other, now dancing together. But it was done so seriously, I mean it was as though these people could actually dance. How? Why? It removed all humour from the situation. Perhaps the spell made them expert dancers, perhaps they were previously expert dancers, but it would have been so much funnier if they couldn't dance. And with a different tune. It was so bad, so humourless, I knew I couldn't go on.

    Are they great dancers in the book? Is 'love' the meaning of it all? If so, give me Douglass Adams every time and remove this humourless, grey, mediocre, empty nonsense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    It's hard to say Priceless . I didn't find that episode problematic and I think the worst thing about The Watch isn't something you'd suffer from (it's failure to be like the Discworld Pratchett wrote). It isn't very funny (which is a travesty as an adaptation of Practchett's work). But I did find what they were doing in seeing those in a group felt to be social oddities come to believe in themselves interesting enough. I really enjoyed it overall, and my favourite episode was episode 7. But I think the tone is pretty consistent through them all, so I'm not sure you would find it less problematic than how you are feeling now about it.

    But then it is really rare that I'll drop something I've started watching/reading. Even if it means I am just skimming it or letting an episode play in the background while I read/browse the site. I let it have the chance to pull me back in fully, get to have a rough idea of how it concluded, even if I wouldn't then go on to watch a further season if they did any.

    Leave a comment:


  • Priceless
    replied
    I'm watching ep 4 and it's a little tedious and I cannot believe it's all about love, which seems a bit sophomoric. I don't know if it's the writing, but the humour is lost on me. With a defter touch some things would be much funnier, but this show is so heavy, humour isn't allowed to breathe and it doesn't come from character at all, it's forced upon them and they fight against it.

    Should I continue watching?

    Leave a comment:


  • Priceless
    replied
    Have watched episode two and it is growing on me. There were a couple of funny moments in this and I did actually laugh. I'm not still not fond of any of the characters, but they may grow on me. I wasn't a fan of the naked woman in a rain soaked alley, but it wasn't badly filmed.

    The only thing that worries me is that there doesn't seem to be a lot of plot for 8 episodes. I'm hoping there will be a few twists along the way and the next 6 episodes aren't just filler.

    Leave a comment:


  • TriBel
    commented on 's reply
    "I really like Richard Dormer, but he gurned all the way through this"...sigh...you had to go and remind me didn't you?

  • Stoney
    replied
    I thought Dormer was a surprising casting choice but have loved him in everything else I've seen him in so I was willing to go with it. But he's not a great choice for the book character imo. I got used to him in this, but it was about the third episode before I was just seeing these characters as their own and not problematic versions of the originals. It might be easier to get past issues without having the originals in mind, or perhaps your patience might be stretched more because of a lack of nostalgia pushing you on to continue. It'll be interested to hear if you continue with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Priceless
    replied
    Just watched the first episode. Will watch the next, but am not that excited about it. It seems all over the place, like three different shows in one, and I'm not sure what they're trying to say in any of them.

    I really like Richard Dormer, but he gurned all the way through this and that really put me off. It all seemed . . . done for effect? A box tick exercise? Someone very straights imagining of weirdness?

    I've never read Pratchett, so can't comment on how close this is to the book.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    Originally posted by TriBel View Post
    . Yeah...I knew that and I'm happy to admit I found it difficult. It might have got easier if I'd stuck with it (Carrot didn't seem too removed from the original) but I really couldn't get past a manic Sam...he was the antithesis of what I expected. I haven't seen much about it - I don't think Rhianna Pratchett was happy with it.
    Yes Sam was most definitely not how I'd ever pictured him. It was really how removed he was, although some character facets remained, that made it easier to separate the two in the end. But I don't think it went down very well overall, so I'd be surprised if they do get the second season.

    Leave a comment:


  • TriBel
    replied
    It definitely helped to stop thinking of them as being Pratchett's characters as they weren't intended to be depictions of the book characters precisely as they were
    . Yeah...I knew that and I'm happy to admit I found it difficult. It might have got easier if I'd stuck with it (Carrot didn't seem too removed from the original) but I really couldn't get past a manic Sam...he was the antithesis of what I expected. I haven't seen much about it - I don't think Rhianna Pratchett was happy with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    I ended up really enjoying it and the penultimate episode was fabulous. It definitely helped to stop thinking of them as being Pratchett's characters as they weren't intended to be depictions of the book characters precisely as they were. After a couple of episodes I had gotten comfortable with it and really enjoyed it overall. The final episode was a bit disappointing though sadly and they seemed to create a very sudden character shift but I expect that is all about looking to set up for a second season and possibly the 'twist' again that they are playing the system and will eventually return to their previous stance. I don't know, but there were definitely some disappointing elements in the finale and I think that is because it was really all about set up and the S1 finale had greatly happened the episode before. I'd have to rewatch it really to see if I was missing something in that final ep.

    Leave a comment:


  • TriBel
    replied
    I lasted 20 minutes...it was a gurn too far. I honestly believe there should be a caveat attached to the contract of anyone making a Pratchett film: "if it's crap we'll sacrifice your firstborn to one of the Small Gods". It might help focus their minds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    replied
    I've relaxed into this series even more. I think Carrot is the closest to the original character and to be honest, otherwise just don't see them as being the same. I can almost imagine they are future generations of the same families. It's still enjoyable as its own thing and I've come to love Richard Dormer's gurning 'Sam'.

    I got up to The Dark in the Dark ep6 tonight which dug into breaking outside of social expectations, prejudice and gaining confidence in yourself. I can see the appeal in modern times of exploring the mix up of people drawn to Ankh Morpork and using the series for considering some general othering issues, individuality and acceptance of self. Interested to see where they are going to go with the idea of scouring multiple universes and finding 'the worst version' of Sam.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stoney
    started a topic The Watch

    The Watch

    I'm currently watching the fantasy police procedural 'The Watch', inspired by Terry Pratchett's Discworld characters in the Ankh-Morpork City Watch. It was originally released in America at the start of the year (I think), but I only just downloaded the episodes and started to go through them last week.

    After the first episode I really wasn't sure I could enjoy it. There are main characters missing (currently at least) and most of the characters included that I know and love from the novels just don't look like I had them pictured (or how Josh Kirby and Paul Kidby depicted them) at all. I'm still struggling a little with Richard Dormer's physical mannerisms for Sam Vimes, although I think some of his character struggles are being explored very interestingly. I had expected to find this with Vimes though when I knew Dormer was cast for the part I thought it was an unusual choice. But I *love* Richard Dormer, adore his accent and the timbre of his voice, so I was ready to try to roll with it and see what they were trying.

    I'm two episodes in now and once that initial surprise of shifted expectations had passed, I did find myself settling into it a bit more. It helped to remind myself that it is only 'based on' too. I'm looking forward to seeing where they take the story and if there are any other characters I know that will be included.
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