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Favorite Game of Thrones Moments -- Season 1 Edition (full S1 spoilers)

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  • Favorite Game of Thrones Moments -- Season 1 Edition (full S1 spoilers)

    I'm in a full on obsessive geek out about this whole franchise, I'm reading the books now, too, but not going to read ahead of the series so as to be surprised each season

    But I've already started rewatching, plus I"m reading A Game of Thrones and experiencing the print version of my favorite scenes, so I wonder what others people love. Here is an off the cuff list of favorite moments --

    -- Khal Drogo decides to conquer Westeros. I haven't seen the new Conan, nor anything else Jason Momoa is in, but damn if he isn't an actor's actor in this scene. The character covers a broad range of emotions in that scene, and he's doing it in an invented language you'd think was his first. His love and concern for Dany, his gratitude to Jorah... but then FURY and passion as he spells out his intentions to gift his son with the iron chair, and seven kingdoms. It actually disappointed me that the invasion never came to pass, because WOW scary.

    -- Catelyn taking Tyrion. It's so delicately, artfully done the way she knows all her father's bannermen (all the lessons Arya is so bad at), and praises each of them all as the pretext for accusing Tyrion and bidding them take him for her.

    -- Lord Mormont's speech to Jon spelling out for him the difference between their war beyond the wall and what his half-brother was waging. I mean, I was about ready to take the black myself after That Guy from Braveheart told Jon about the stakes that the Night's Watch would have to play for with Winter coming and the White Walkers returning.

    -- Ned spotting Arya on the statue pedestal and having only the one brief chance to try to protect her. It's just gutwrenching; he doesn't really *know* Yoren, but the man is probably the only person in King's Landing at that point even remotely trustworthy, and he can't even really *tell* him anything without putting Arya in more danger, not less. Just that brief, urgent "Baelor" and the hope that the guy could help her, would help her. Also, it's very painful to watch Arya look around the courtyard as the crowd calls for her father's head. Why would they hate her father so much, not realize that he couldn't possibly be a traitor? Sad.

    -- Syrio MFing Forel facing down the Lannister men sent for Arya with a wooden stick, and his total confidence and assuring posture toward Arya throughout the whole thing. I sure hope he made it through. It's never too late for more Syrio, George! Also, can't forget Septa Mordane buying Sansa a chance to hide, too.

    Anybody else have some faves from Season 1? Might start a Season 2 thread later
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  • #2
    You've mentioned some of my fav moments there the main one being Ned's death scene I cried when I watched the show and then again when I read the first book. Like you I've just started reading them. I'm onto the second one now but only on chapter 4 but that has been the only scene that has made me cry so far. Arya breaks my heart in this one and Sansa, her whole world is torn apart in front of her eyes, the people she thought she should trust turn on her and take away her only link to her home and on top of that if it wasn't for her it ever would have happened, her innocence died that day along with her farther.

    I love the scene when drogo kills Danny's brother I thought that was a really powerful scene not just for Drogo but for Danny finally realising her brother wasn't the last dragon, that she had the power to libert herself from him you could see it in her body language that she charged that day she was no longer a child looked after by her brother or a prisoner for a savage man, she was truly loved by her people her husband a mother a queen and the true last dragon.

    Another great scene for me was when ned says good bye to Jon but I have my theory about Jon which may not be for this thread

    Also since reading the book one of my fav scenes was I one if the very first. When Jon finds the wolves at first when I watched it I was too engrossed in seeing these dire wolves I didn't get the significance of the death of the mother dire wolf with the stag antler in its neck but when It was spelled out in the book it really showed the foreshadowing of that scene.

    There are just so many but there are my main few.
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    • #3
      I haven't seen GoT all the way through, just caught odd episodes. I know most of the story through listening to others talk about it. I thought I'd seen most of Season 1, but I'm watching from the very beginning and so far I'm not remembering much. I'll probably post my thoughts here as I go along. As this thread was already here I though I'd use it.

      - - - Updated - - -

      Tyrion Lannister is very blonde. I don't remember him being blonde later on

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      • #4
        I saw clips the other day when they had gameshowofthrones on and I was really taken aback at how young the actor looked in S1 and yes, blond. Perhaps he just stopped washing as much with later events or got a new hairgel.
        Last edited by Stoney; 06-04-19, 08:32 PM.

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        • #5
          They do look so young. Kit Harrington looks like a teenager

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          • #6
            I've just discovered I've got 1 - 4 on DVD so I might rewatch. I reckon I have a rare condition called "Amazon Somnambulism" cos I honestly don't remember buying them. Two of the boxes are sealed - maybe I shoplift in my sleep?
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            • #7
              I imagine your house just filled to overflowing with books, records and dvds and overstuffed armchairs

              But it would be fun if you watched too I'm on ep two, just as one of the wolf-dogs rips Bran's attacker to pieces, but it just looks like the actor playing with him.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Priceless View Post
                I imagine your house just filled to overflowing with books, records and dvds and overstuffed armchairs

                But it would be fun if you watched too I'm on ep two, just as one of the wolf-dogs rips Bran's attacker to pieces, but it just looks like the actor playing with him.
                Oh bloody hell. I'd forgotten about the wolves - and Joffrey! Yay - I've just taken S1/2 out of the cupboard and found Treme 1-4 box-set unopened! I didn't even know they'd done a S4! It's still got the price label on so I must have acquired it myself. It looks as though I sleep-steal from Fopp. Oh God! It's probably my fault they closed the Manchester store!

                - - - Updated - - -

                Episode 1.

                a) I'm fed up with naked women.
                b) I'd forgotten how young they all were and how much I dislike Alfie Allen.
                c) I'd also forgotten how many of them die and I'm wishing a few of them would die before their time.

                Ghost! John Snow's got Ghost!

                And then there's Joffrey...the fact that Joffrey's alive and the mother direwolf isn't is proof we live in a cold, uncaring world.
                Last edited by TriBel; 07-04-19, 01:09 AM.
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                • #9
                  Joffrey is terrible. Sansa is questionnable. There are tits everywhere. And so far 3 rape scenes and I'm only at episode 4. I'm also a bit turned off by all the prostitutes being so damn happy. I used to hate Tyrions accent, but it's not bothering me so much on the re-watch.

                  There is some good stuff. The story is exciting and there are shocks and surprises, which are fun. The settings are great, you can see the production values are high and a lot of money was spent. I love Ned, Arya and Daenerys, and really like Littlefinger and Ian Glenn's character, whose name I can't recall.

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                  • #10
                    Joffrey makes me want to vomit - without going into the bathroom to do it. Joffrey makes me want to vomit in public. I'm okay with Tyrion's accent - it grew on me. I just wish his beard would grow as fast. Sean Bean though sounds like a bloke from Sheffield pretending to be a bloke from Sheffield. I think I'm from the wrong (right) side of The Pennines. I worry about the direwolves.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TriBel View Post
                      Joffrey makes me want to vomit - without going into the bathroom to do it. Joffrey makes me want to vomit in public. I'm okay with Tyrion's accent - it grew on me. I just wish his beard would grow as fast. Sean Bean though sounds like a bloke from Sheffield pretending to be a bloke from Sheffield. I think I'm from the wrong (right) side of The Pennines. I worry about the direwolves.
                      I was following the timeline from the size of those direwolves and it was a bit confusing. They were puppies, then they were fully grown dogs. When Bran was pushed from the tower ('the things I do for love' was a funny line) the dog at the bottom looking like a pup, yet when he attacked the guy who was trying to kill Bran, he was a fully grown dog.

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                      • #12
                        Yeah...I thought that. Maybe they're little wolves with big ideas - aspirational wolves? Maybe they're a metaphor? And that was said tongue in cheek but I've just realised it actually works...damn.
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                        • #13
                          Enjoyed Ep 4, with the introduction on Sam and his friendship with Jon.

                          Daenerys had a great line when her brother hit her, 'I am a Khaleesi of the Dothraki! I am the wife of the great Khal and I carry his son inside me! The next time you raise a hand to me will be the last time you have hands'. Such a great line!

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                          • #14
                            Finished Season 1. Loved the ending; Dany and her dragons. Other things I loved were Khal Drogo almost going into the Haka declaring he'd make his wife an Empress. Every scene Sean Bean was in. Can't wait to see more of Sansa and Arya's adventures. Love to hate Joffrey. Loved Dany's brother getting his just deserts.

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                            • #15
                              I watched a favourite scenes programme on GoT recently where they talked to celebs and members of the cast and I was really taken aback by how vicious people were towards the characters. I get saying things like you have above, that her brother got his just deserts, but several of these people were remarking on the death of a character they disliked and detailing their wish that it had been more violent, more strung out for them, more painful and gruelling a death. I honestly found it a bit alarming and am telling myself that it is just because it isn't real life that people express the desire to see more extreme suffering in the way they were. But I am a bit unsettled and am not completely sure that is true. I hope it is, that it is just sounding off, but if not, just wow.

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                              • #16
                                Some of the characters do heinous things Stoney, and I can see why an audience would want to make them pay in the most painful way possible. It's a very violent show and perhaps the audience are feeding into that. People don't just die on GoT, it's incredibly operatic and heightened, with close up shots of wounds or the blood seeping from someone's nose, or gurgling convulsively from someone's mouth. It seems to be a show aimed at nerdy 14 year old boys.

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                                • #17
                                  Some of the characters do heinous things Stoney, and I can see why an audience would want to make them pay in the most painful way possible.
                                  I've watched it all before and I'm having problems watching it again simply because of my absolute loathing for Joffrey. I want him to die in the most abject, painful and horrific way possible - nothing is too bad and I want him to die over and over again. Sorry Stoney!

                                  At the moment, I'm full of glee 'cos Tyrion slapped him several times.
                                  Last edited by TriBel; 08-04-19, 06:16 PM.
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                                  • #18
                                    Spoiler:
                                    I saw Joffrey die, I know it happens, and it's really very good Can't wait to get to it on this re-watch

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                                    • #19
                                      I've watched all of the seasons and I have no issue with it being a very violent society and that there are violent deaths. I'm not balking at them in the context of the show generally. It is the audience wish for more violence beyond what the show gives that I find disconcerting. The show is a fantasy show in a fictional setting, the people chanting for more are people that I could walk past in the street. Or someone that somebody I loved and cared for could accidentally wrong. The characters very often have horrifically painful deaths. The thing that people are wishing for actually occurs. The bloodthirstiness of wanting it to be endured for two, three times as long, for it to have been even more utterly horrifying than it was I find disturbing in a way that the original death/context/violence isn't to me.

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                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Stoney View Post
                                        I've watched all of the seasons and I have no issue with it being a very violent society and that there are violent deaths. I'm not balking at them in the context of the show generally. It is the audience wish for more violence beyond what the show gives that I find disconcerting. The show is a fantasy show in a fictional setting, the people chanting for more are people that I could walk past in the street. Or someone that somebody I loved and cared for could accidentally wrong. The characters very often have horrifically painful deaths. The thing that people are wishing for actually occurs. The bloodthirstiness of wanting it to be endured for two, three times as long, for it to have been even more utterly horrifying than it was I find disturbing in a way that the original death/context/violence isn't to me.
                                        I absolutely agree—

                                        I, too, have no problem with the violence in the show,
                                        primarily because it always seems to me to be problematized:
                                        Sandor Clegane (the Hound), for example, offers a running
                                        commentary on the pleasure of killing that asks us to think
                                        about the role that pleasure takes not only within that society's
                                        structures—how productive it is and how much it is occluded,
                                        even by those who participate in it—but within our own, the
                                        pleasure we take as viewers in certain violent acts. In this
                                        way, the violence is never gratuitous: is has meaning, meaning
                                        it so often lacks in Hollywood productions, which I refuse to
                                        watch.

                                        I also value the imbrication of violence and sex: so many of
                                        the sex scenes are far from erotic, and in this, they show
                                        how entangled sex and violence can be.

                                        In both, I see the show as far more than mere fantasy: the
                                        setting may be fantasy, an imagined medieval society, but
                                        what it shows also offers a commentary upon our own culture:
                                        the workings of violence, patriarchy, sexuality, power... This
                                        works even though the society is definitely premodern, in
                                        Foucault's sense, is not biopolitical, is not one in which life
                                        has entered into history, become a subject of power's
                                        regulation and submission to norms.

                                        On another level, my favorite moments in S1—I'll save comments
                                        upon other seasons for other threads—tend to be the small ones,
                                        the moments you almost pass by but that, upon reflection or rewatch,
                                        reveal depths of character or social structure that run thickly
                                        through the whole:

                                        • Jon's gift of a sword to Arya, which reveals both his affection for
                                        and his understanding of her, an understanding no one else in the
                                        family exhibits, reveals the deep tie connection between them, a
                                        connection whose shape we will, I hope, see come to fruition in
                                        the coming season.

                                        • The moment Dany steps into the steaming bath: her steely
                                        strength and determination, her experimental way of living, her
                                        endless testing of herself—that stepping foreshadows all of this.

                                        • Arya standing on the top of the steps, balancing, then explaining
                                        to Ned how she is trying to be a cat—and the conversation between
                                        them that follows: Arya's self-knowledge and Ned's limits, the
                                        intensification of her physical intelligence, the way in which her
                                        body and mind are so deeply intertwined, an intertwining that will,
                                        in time, birth in her a bodily ethics.

                                        • Jon's talk with Tyrion on the Wall: John's realization of what
                                        the Night's Watch is and the depth of his abandonment—and
                                        Tyrion's unspoken understanding, the point at which their
                                        shared abandonment meets, fulfilling Tyrion's earlier statement
                                        to Jon, the one he was not ready to hear: "All dwarves are
                                        bastards in their fathers' eyes."

                                        • Maester Aemon's revelation of his identity to Jon, which
                                        gives a relation to power different from any that we have seen,
                                        a renunciation of mastery that is not passivity—we won't see
                                        Jon's understanding of this until later seasons, but we do
                                        see the way it moves him, moves into him.

                                        • Sam and the others going after Jon, their recitation of the
                                        Night's Watch oath, the elaboration of family made not
                                        through bloodlines, crucial as they are in the show, but
                                        through shared mission—and shared abjection.

                                        • And what is not a small moment, but one that lingers: Dany
                                        and her dragons. Ambivalent as I am about Dany (something that,
                                        from what I have heard of hte books, has much to do with her
                                        casting), that moment, which echoes back to her step into the
                                        bath, her approach to life, its temporalities—much as she is
                                        driven by teleology, a set goal, her way of getting there is
                                        threaded with lines of flight, a willingness to risk the step
                                        into the unknown, into pure futurity, which gives her
                                        revolutionary force.

                                        There are others, but for now, I have said enough....


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