Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

4.11 Family Remains

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 4.11 Family Remains

    So here I am starting a thread for the new episode of Supernatural - check me out!

    So now I've started it I have no idea what to say about this episode. I guess I'll just go with random thoughts....

    Another strong S4 episode - The Benders 2! How is it that SN manages to make me squirm and jump the most when it's humans we're talking about?

    Definately suspenseful, I watched the whole thing holding my breath

    The idea of those kids being locked away all their lives and the circumstances of them being born in the first place - there's not enough yuck in the world.

    The family were nice and realistic - caring about each other, but still sniping and moaning. I guessed the dead son thing pretty early on, but was surprised that it didn't have a bearing on the outcome of the plot. I loved Dean's speech to the father about him saving the boy, Danny, and how he couldn't answer when the father said "Why do you care so much?"

    The reveal at the end, well I was open mouthed when Dean said he did that stuff in hell for pleasure. I guess that they couldn't end two episodes in a row with Dean crying, but I think that tears should've made an appearance when talking about that. I don't know maybe I'm just too much of a girl to understand manly stoicism.

    Where this leads us for the rest of the season, is anyone's guess. Are we heading for a redemption story line for Dean? Nothing wrong with that, but it has been a little over done on TV in the past few years, so I'm not sure.

    I was puzzled though by the "Then" montage. Normally, when we see characters from previous episodes (i.e. Castiel) in a "previously" section it means they're going to make an appearance, or at least be mentioned in the story, but no. Nothing of Castiel, or him being an angel, or even pulling Dean out of hell, just my own knowledge that it has a bearing because Dean is no longer in hell and Cas is responsible for that - just kinda seemed odd and a weird way to introduce the episode.

    Hmm? Reading back my very lame thoughts on the episode I think I need to watch again.
    sigpic

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

  • #2
    Yay, show is back!

    Now, I've seen a few people (on LJ) saying they were a bit bored by this episode, and, okay, it wasn't a thrill ride like some this season. I liked that, though. I enjoyed that it was a solid, old-fashioned spooky case file, a chance to catch our breath and take stock of where the brothers are at right now. It got a bit grim toward the end, mind. Show often finds itself on uneasy ground with human perpetrators ? I think I might have preferred it if it had just been a straightforward ghost story. But, of course, the uneasy ground was kinda the whole point.

    If the creepy brother and sister had been locked up all their lives, never seeing light and winding up little more than wild animals?how come they were literate enough to leave written messages? It doesn't seem likely that the father/grandfather would have taught them, given that he left them locked up underground in filth. Did the mother teach them a little before killing herself? How long ago was that meant to be? Would those lessons really have stuck? It didn't seem as if they could even speak, so the writing seemed a little odd ? more of a mislead to convince us it was a ghost, than necessarily consistent with what we later learned.

    Best not to examine the logic too closely, perhaps.

    Also, is it just me or has Show forgotten a few of its own established rules on ghosts? They certainly seem to have made the boys forget a little of what they know. That's twice this season the brothers have assumed that because someone was cremated they couldn't possibly still be wandering around as a spirit. Yet it was established as far back as Provenance that cremation of the corpse doesn't always prevent a spirit finding something else to cling onto, and that isn't the only example!

    The family of innocents were a little on the dull side, but only because they were so refreshingly average, and I felt intrigued by the hints of tragedy in their past, enough to want to know the full story and to feel bad for them when I did.

    What I mostly liked about the episode was, as I said, the chance to take a good look at where the brothers are right now. It isn't what you'd call pretty, and nor should it be. I really appreciate that the traumatic end of the last episode wasn't just brushed back under the carpet, as sometimes happens on this show, but was dealt with head-on, the episode allowing time and space for Dean's ongoing issues to unfold alongside the plot, season one/two-style. Sam's little info-dump at the beginning was a little clunky, perhaps, but gave us the information we needed going into the episode. It's been a month since the end of Heaven and Hell and Dean is just barely hanging on, having fallen back on his classic coping strategy of denial. This is how Dean always deals with trauma: he buries himself in work, in the here-and-now, and tries to carry on as if nothing is wrong.

    Something is wrong, though, and that is clear throughout, which comes as a relief given how inconsistent this storyline has been until now. Sam lays it out for us at the start ? lurching from one job to another without a break, exhausted, running on fumes ? but we can see it for ourselves. All his rough edges are sharp and jagged. He's a little too invested in his work, for the wrong reasons ? that compassionate focus has always been a strength but came across more as desperation here. He's off-balance and over-compensating, worn down and hollowed out.

    And Sam doesn't know what to do. He doesn't know how to help. He can't help, and Dean won't let him help, because that might just be the straw that breaks the camel's back. So he's doing the only thing he can do ? he's taking a step back, letting Dean do what he's got to do to get by, and keeping a close, careful watch over him. It kinda feels like Sam's reached much the same place Dean hit in early season two, where it feels a little easier and safer to worry about his brother than to think about his own problems, but the overall combination of the two is exhausting and there is no relief of any kind in sight.

    Nope, the boys are in a bad place, which they should be, so that was satisfying. I loved all the little moments where Dean snapped, brittle as he is, teetering on the edge without ever quite going over, and that Sam was so cautious and careful around him, treading on egg shells. I also really appreciated that Dean isn't trying to hide from Sam the fact that he is struggling. They both know what's going on and why, so what would be the point? Instead they just both tacitly acknowledge that Dean's having a hard time and get on with the job regardless, because it's all they can do. I also appreciated that although Sam knows Dean is struggling, he completely trusts him to be able to do the job regardless ? compare this with his deeply sceptical although no less concerned reaction to Dean's tailspin in Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things in season two. They've come a long way. Their relationship may still be a little on the difficult side, after everything that's happened, but they are making forward progress, as best they can. Lurching onward because there is no way back and they don't dare stand still.

    Struggling or not, Dean is still very good at what he does, and that came across well, however much he might feel that he failed by losing one of the innocents he was trying to protect, which also came across loud and clear. His identification with the deeply damaged individuals so murderously roaming the walls of the house was also nicely woven into the plot and development, more subtly than Show sometimes achieves.

    'Twas a very dark episode, visually. I didn't have too much trouble following the action, though, which was good, although the night vision in the scene or the boy waking up underground was a little weird. Was that meant to be the perspective of one of the cellar-dwellers?

    Also, it is just me or has Sam had a bit of a haircut?

    I loved that the brothers were sleeping in the car at the beginning, just crashing rather than bothering to find a motel after their last job just a few hours earlier. Well, that Sam was sleeping in the car, stretched out across the back seat (as far as possible, giant that he is), with Dean not allowing himself to sleep. Disturbed sleep has been the most consistent theme in Dean's post-hell storyline. That set-up of the scene, in itself, just the visual information it presents us with, tells us a hell of a lot.

    Dean's heading for a crash; he knows it and Sam knows it, but he's trying hard to outrun it and Sam is letting him, because they are both so horribly broken and neither one is capable of putting the other back together again, not any more, certainly not right now.

    I liked that they got so totally sprung trespassing at the start and just had to blag their way out of it as best they could at the same time as trying to keep the family out of the property. A story like that dreamt up on spec was never going to work, but it was a valiant effort! I enjoyed that they just went charging in when they heard screams and then just had to go with the flow and come out with the truth, despite having dismissed it as a valid option just moments earlier. I loved how furious Dean was that some 'ghost' would mess with his car, and that all their weapons were stolen, forcing them to improvise. I couldn't quite understand why they didn't already have weapons about their persons, though ? surely they'd have been carrying something when they charged into the house upon hearing screams!

    I do kind of wish Show would stop with the emotional post-script scenes; they are getting a little overdone and predictable now. Surprise us by weaving those little reveals into the text a little more, please! I did appreciate the nonchalance of the scene, though: that they'd just randomly stopped to eat and Dean randomly decided this was as good a time as any to explain a little more to Sam about why this case got to him so badly and why he can't forgive himself for his actions in hell. And that Dean rejecting food is always a sure sign that something is wrong, and Sam knows it. And that Dean is willing to talk to Sam about hell now, albeit in drips and drabs, trickling out here and there, and that he was able to face his brother while he talked. It's still just telling rather than actual conversation, not wanting to hear any excuses or absolution, but it's a start.

    As for what Dean said? Well, I'm no psychologist, but I'm fairly certain that when someone is forced to commit heinous acts and learns to derive twisted pleasure from it, within the context of very extreme circumstances, that's a recognised psychological phenomenon. The mind has ways of protecting itself, by adapting to the circumstances in which it finds itself. It's a defence mechanism. More than that ? it's a survival mechanism ? like a soldier called up to an especially bloody war, say the front lines of WWI. He didn't volunteer to go and kill people; he was drafted. He might have never harmed so much as a fly in his life. But he is there nonetheless, in the midst of the carnage, and the only way he will survive is if he completely surrenders his normal code of ethics and allows bloodlust to consume him ? it is the only thing that will allow him to do what he has to do in order to survive.

    I also tend to suspect that despite everything Dean has said about having total recall, there has to be an awful lot he still doesn't understand about his time in hell. Whether objective or subjective, forty years is very long time for all details to remain sharp, especially given the transition between different planes of existence. Most people would struggle to offer a full and frank account of everything they did, thought and felt a year ago, never mind ten, twenty or forty years ago. I imagine Dean has a lot of fragmentary memories floating around, not necessarily in their proper order, like scrambled pieces of a massive jigsaw ? thoughts, feelings and impressions, all removed from their context and crashing hard against the reinstated reality of his human existence. No wonder he can't cope.

    Sam must feel so helpless and hopeless.

    So, maybe not the most exciting episode ever, but emotionally satisfying, which is all I asked of it. It's great to have the show back!

    Comment


    • #3
      I thought this episode was pretty creepy...I was happy that it wasn't totally focused around the angels/demons etc. etc. thing again. It is nice to just have regular job episodes.

      Did anyone else find it a little odd that no one mentioned the fact that 'hey, we just killed two humans?' and how does that feel? I mean, yes, they couldn't exactly be left to continue on their merry, cannabilistic way, but I still thought that there might be a little more impact to the fact that they killed two 'victims.'
      I have loved you. - Ser Jorah Mormont

      Comment


      • #4
        Was anyone else thinking of Neil Gaiman's The Wolves in the Walls?

        I prefer the angels/demons stuff to monster (or in this case, humans) of the week stories, but I did enjoy this one. The little girl was bloody creepy. Where did her brother come from though? Were there two babies?

        So, enjoyable, but I want more Castiel and Uriel (and Anna, if she's ever coming back). Dean's confession felt a little tacked on at the end, but it's interesting. I wish they'd written the revelation a little more naturally, perhaps have it coming out in a confrontation with a demon or summat.


        -- Robofrakkinawesome BANNER BY FRANCY --

        Comment


        • #5
          I am sure Family Remains will be received very controversial in fandom, but I for my part can say that this is exactly the kind of episode I needed after Heaven and Hell. It had a classic S1 feeling, a creepy casefile with subtle parallels to Dean’s situation, and no interferences from angels or demons. Where I was missing the room for Dean’s storyline to unfold in Heaven and Hell, Family Remains provided that space and allowed for an emotionally satisfying interaction between the brothers in the aftermath of Dean’s confession. Once again Jeremy Carver convinced me with his character driven writing and managed to put some of my issues that arose out of Heaven and Hell to rest, and I am grateful for that.

          Eric Kripke stated in a recent interview that Family Remains was Supernatural’s attempt at creating an equivalent to the highly disturbing X-Files episode Home. The episode about a family of inbreds was actually the first X-Files episode ever that was aired with a viewer warning upfront and it caused so much controversy that Fox decided to never show that episode on television again and indeed they only re-aired it once, on Halloween. Funny enough it was Kim Manners, everybody’s favourite SN director, who directed Home. In the end though Supernatural’s version of the theme is still a lot tamer than the X-Files’ version, the latter easily makes it into my Top3 of most disturbing things that I have ever seen on a movie or television screen.

          Nevertheless I appreciated it a lot that the show took a step back from the mytharc and returned to its classic horror roots, complete with a dark cinematography, haunted houses, enclosed spaces and gory deaths. While a lot of this season’s episodes were plot driven, Family Remains took a slower pace and concentrated on character exploration alongside the casefile, reflecting Dean’s struggles with his hell memories in the tragedies of the families they encounter. That’s classic S1/2 approach to a standalone episode and it was done with a lot more subtlety than the parallels between Sam and Jack in Metamorphosis. Personally I urgently needed this focus on Dean’s issues to finally find a better emotional access to Dean’s story this season.

          Sam: "You’re exhausted Dean."
          Dean: "I’m good!"
          Sam: "No, you’re not. You’re running on fumes. You can’t run forever."


          I completely adore the opening sequence with the boys crashing in the car in the middle of nowhere. Sam trying to sleep in the backseat and Dean restless in the front, searching for a new case. It tells us everything we need to know about the frame of mind of both boys: Sam is clearly exhausted, tired and at the end of his rope. Dean chasing from case to case in a desperate attempt to outrun his issues has them both running on fumes, but Sam has no other way to support his brother than to go along with everything Dean throws at him and so he does.

          Dean’s confession to Sam that he tortured souls in hell clearly broke down his walls and the iron grip he had on his feelings over the last couple of weeks is slipping, allowing his conflicts to manifest in his behaviour. He is on the edge throughout the episode, desperate to fill the emptiness inside him with something, anything, burying himself in his work, in an attempt to undo his perceived guilt by saving as many people as he can. His motivation for the hunt has a similar desperate undertone as Sam’s attempts in S2 to save his soul and change his destiny by doing as much good as possible. The hunt became a means to an end, it’s not so much about saving others, but about saving themselves at the moment.

          Sam knows there is nothing he can do or say to his brother that makes it any better, so he lets Dean do what he needs to do, while he hovers in the background, worried and protective, just there at Dean’s back, ready to step in, in case Dean needs him. He knows Dean tries to pretend that nothing happened, Dean knows that Sam knows it and it‘s obvious that they just wait for the other shoe to drop. They are both clearly hurting, struggling to keep it together, but have no other option than to soldier on nonetheless. I think the emotional strain both boys are under is bound to find a more or less explosive release sooner or later and I am sure it won’t be pretty but it will probably allow them to breathe easier afterwards.

          Anyway, Sam and Dean's exhaustion though showed in their limited capability to handle the case. For example they were splitting the family up, instead of keeping them together and gain power by joining forces, entered a presumedly haunted house unarmed and unprepared and Dean left a civilian alone in a critical situation, these are all mistakes that speak volumes of their overtired and distraught state of mind. They are hunting because they need the distraction and not because they are up for it emotionally and/or physically. They are running low and it shows.

          Susan Carter: "I just don’t understand why that happens to us. I mean, we’re good people, we’re a good family."

          As mentioned before the episode plot offered a lot of parallels to the brothers’ struggles on different levels. I have to mention here how much I love the ambiguity of the episode title Family Remains, because on the one hand it alludes to the saying that family is the one thing that stays with you, no matter the circumstances and on the other hand it refers to the fact that for all three families in this episode, the loss and tragedy that hit them, only left remains of the families they used to be. Ben Gibson spiralled out of control after losing his wife, the Carters tried to cope with the loss of their oldest son and the Winchesters, well, we all know that one.

          The parallel between Sam and Dean and the Carter family was obvious: The Carters trying to outrun the tragedy in their lives by moving into a new house, trying to leave the memories behind, only to find that they follow you wherever you go, mirrored Dean’s attempts to outrun his memories of hell. Both families try to pretend that everything will be okay, but it turns out to be a desperate self-illusion only for the sake of keeping them going somehow and they have to face what happened to them in the end nonetheless.

          In the case of the abused Gibson siblings Dean clearly identified with the victims, who were turned into murderous sociopaths by their tragic circumstances. Tortured by their father, they had no other option than to turn to violence, just like Dean broke under the torture in hell. Dean’s devastated expression after he killed the brother in self-defence leaves no doubt how deeply conflicted he is about that kill. In the end he was an innocent, but there was nothing Dean could have done, the kid was too far gone. It’s typical though that Dean can see the parallels between his own surrender to violence and the Gibson’s, but is unable to transfer his insight that they were victimized to himself as well.

          Dean: "I enjoyed it, Sam. They took me off the rack and I tortured souls, and I liked it. All those years, all that pain, to finally get to deal some out yourself. I didn’t care who they put in front of me because that pain I felt, it just slipped away."

          If we think about it, it’s not really surprising that Dean started to enjoy the very thing he would loathe under normal circumstances. All demons we have met in the show so far enjoyed wreaking havoc and inflicting pain for their own pleasure. As Ruby stated, hell means forgetting who you are, being stripped of your humanity and that’s what happened to Dean. He took the first steps on the way to becoming a demon and all the changes in personality it would entail. That doesn’t change the fact though that he was a victim, who simply adapted to the extreme circumstances in order to protect himself.

          I think in psychological terms what Dean experienced is best described as a derivation of the so-called Stockholm Syndrom, a psychological phenomenon where victims of hostage situations start to sympathise and identify with their perpetrators. The loss of control over what is happening to them is often hard to bear for the victims, and so they try to regain that control by convincing themselves that what happens to them is what they want and they take an active part in it. As a result of their emotional identification with the perpetrator the victims give up their own norms and values and take on those of the agressors. It’s a form of self-defence that can continue even after the victims escaped their situation. To deny that they were victims usually allows them to function after they returned to their every day life. Eventually though they are no longer able to sustain the self-deception and need to face the reality.

          Dean started to identify with his role as a torturer in hell because it was the only way how he could deal with what he was forced to do. He admits himself that his own pain slipped away when he inflicted it on others, so he was convinced that he enjoyed it. After experiencing the pain of torture for 30 years, the sudden absence of that pain has indeed to feel like pleasure and it’s easily understandable that Dean was driven to stay in that pain-free state, no matter the cost. That’s no genuine enjoyment of the act of torturing though, it’s survival instinct, it’s self-preservation. To protect himself from more pain he decided to inflict it on other, but since that contradicts his own values he justified it by convincing himself that he wanted and enjoyed it. I think the fact that he gave into this self-protective instinct is the thing that haunts Dean the most. By surrendering he became a monster in his own mind, by choice even, no matter the circumstances that preceded that choice.

          After Dean came back from hell he had to face up to the things he did, but in the 'normal' world he was unable to relate his actions to the circumstances that created them. He perceives his guilt, but not his innocence. In the light of this revelation Dean’s lack of brokenness in the first half of the season makes a lot more sense, because even when Dean started to remember his time in hell, he simply denied what happened to him. He negated the reality of being a helpless victim and focused solely on his guilt for what he did. The post-hell symptoms I expected for Dean this season would have been a consequence of being victimized, but Dean suppresses that facet of his stay in hell and sees himself as the aggressor, as the one who was in control, and that's a huge difference. It’s obvious that Dean is far from being able to forgive himself for his actions in hell, and I am pretty sure that as long as he isn’t able to face what was done to him as well, he never will be.

          Again Sam does the only thing he can do, listening to his brother, offering support, but he has to feel immensely pained and helpless in the face of his brother’s struggle, knowing that Dean went through all this for him. That’s an impossible burden to bear and I hope that the show addresses this problem at some point. The exploration of Sam’s issues in the show is more often than not limited to the meaning of his powers and I would really like to see his interpersonal issues explored more thoroughly as well.

          Anyway, while I sometimes struggle with the enormous amount of burdens they put on Dean’s (and Sam’s) shoulders over the years, I also admire about this show that it rarely shies away from hitting our heroes with the full consequences of their decisions and actions, even if they are uncomfortable for the viewer. These boys live incredibly harsh and complicated lives and sometimes the consequences are ugly and they never try to euphemise that. Still, they manage to keep the viewer’s sympathy with the characters, making us feel for them even when they face their darkest times.

          What else is noteworthy:

          One of the few lighter moments in the episode that I adored was the little back and forth exchange after Dean muttered 'know-it-all' under his breath, annoyed at his brother for showing off his knowledge and trying to get back at him. Such a typical siblings thing. Also, it was great to hear the 'We could tell them the truth' in-joke between them again, we didn't have that one for quite a while.

          There were a couple of minor plot inconsistencies in the episode. For example, the flickering lights made no sense, given that there was no real ghost activity. Also, on the one hand the siblings were depicted as savages, but on the other hand they were able to write and talk. These plotholes though were clearly the result of trying to not give away the surprise twist too early and didn’t really bother me, since the character exploration of Sam and Dean was spot on in the episode. I am easy to please that way.

          In conclusion: I always loved Supernatural’s mix between solid standalones and mytharc driven episodes and I realised how much I missed that balance, no matter how thrilling the mytharc turned out this season. Family Remains at least partially returned that balance to me and appeased my fear that there will be no follow-up to Dean’s confession at the end of Heaven and Hell. That alone would have been enough to endear that episode to me, but I also genuinely enjoyed the creepy casefile, no matter the minor plotholes. I am not easily spooked and I always love it when the show manages to scare me.
          Last edited by galathea; 20-01-09, 07:48 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Llywela View Post
            I do kind of wish Show would stop with the emotional post-script scenes; they are getting a little overdone and predictable now. Surprise us by weaving those little reveals into the text a little more, please!
            I couldn't agree more, the last scene seemed kinda tacked on and repetitive. I would have preferred it if they had integrated it better into the narrative flow of the episode. However, the last scene was still my favourite of the entire episode. I'm glad that Dean opens up to Sam more and more about his time in hell. I think Chris' explanation about Dean having a sort of Stockholm Syndrome is spot-on and I wish Dean learned to forgive himself eventually. Of course he wouldn't be Dean if he didn't struggle with his guilt but I hope that in the course of the season Dean will come to some sort of acceptance of his past in hell.

            As for the rest of the episode, it definitely had a s1 MOTW feel to it, which is not my kind of thing so this episode was not exactly my cup of tea. I found it a bit slow and boring to be honest, especially after 4.09 and 4.10 were such thrilling rides. IMO "The Benders" did a much better job at conveying the atrocities human beings are capable of, plus it was a much more suspenseful and creepy episode.

            Two things made me squee though:

            - Helen Slater's guest appearance! Yay for having Supergirl on the show!

            - The shoutout to one of my favourite movies of the last few years:

            Dean: "Rent Juno. Get over it."



            Hopefully, next week's episode will focus on the mytharc again and reimmerse us in the thrilling ride that is season 4!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Cori View Post
              IMO "The Benders" did a much better job at conveying the atrocities human beings are capable of
              I think the theme was more chosen because it made an excellent mirror to Dean's situation. How humans react to torture. When Sam makes his thoughtless remark about how a life that was hell doesn't justify a murder spree you can see how hurt Dean is, because he connects that statement to himself. That's exactly the judgment he passes onto himself. So I think the theme was well chosen actually.

              Originally posted by Cori View Post
              Hopefully, next week's episode will focus on the mytharc again and reimmerse us in the thrilling ride that is season 4!
              Personally, I feel the exact opposite way. I think that we need a couple of episodes that focus more on Sam and Dean, exploring their brotherly dynamics in the aftermath of their respective confessions. To rush the mytharc and leave the characters behind just doesn't work for this show for me. There has always been a balance of 14 standalones against 8 mytharc episodes and in S4 that balance was broken because of external factors. In the first 10 episodes of the season there have only been 3 episodes that featured Sam and Dean alone. I miss the kind of character/brother exploration independent from the mytharc that goes along with standalone episodes. The angels and demons storyline this season is all well and good, but if it starts to take away time from the brothers' characterisation I'm unhappy.
              Last edited by galathea; 18-01-09, 01:09 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by galathea View Post
                I think the theme was more chosen because it made an excellent mirror to Dean's situation. How humans react to torture. When Sam makes his thoughtless remark about how a life that was hell doesn't justify a murder spree you can see how hurt Dean is, because he connects that statement to himself. That's exactly the judgment he passes onto himself. So I think the theme was well chosen actually.
                That might very well be but I was just not as creeped out or gripped by this episode as I was by "The Benders". Maybe it's because the whole human beings are the worst thing has been done before. I mean even some of Dean's comments sounded the same as in "The Benders". At times I got a "been there, done that" feeling while watching this week's episode. *shrugs* Also, it's very rare that I don't immediately want to rewatch a new SN episode but I haven't really felt the urge to rewatch "Family Remains" at all. I'd rather rewatch the mid-season two-parter for like the gazillionth time.

                Personally, I feel the exact opposite way. I think that we need a couple of episodes that focus more on Sam and Dean, exploring their brotherly dynamics in the aftermath of their respective confessions. To rush the mytharc and leave the characters behind just doesn't work for this show for me. There has always been a balance of 14 standalones against 8 mytharc episodes and in S4 that balance was broken because of external factors. In the first 10 episodes of the season there have only been 3 episodes that featured Sam and Dean alone. I miss the kind of character/brother exploration independent from the mytharc that goes along with standalone episodes. The angels and demons storyline this season is all well and good, but if it starts to take away time from the brothers' characterisation I'm unhappy.
                Maybe but then the next MOTW episodes need to be a lot more interesting and gripping than this one, otherwise I feel this otherwise awesome season will lose momentum for me. However, I do try to have faith in the writers that this won't happen.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cori View Post
                  I'd rather rewatch the mid-season two-parter for like the gazillionth time.
                  ROFL I couldn't even bring myself to rewatch Heaven and Hell over the hiatus. I think no other SN episode ever threw me off the show like that one. For me it felt like the show lost the core of what it is about and I was desperate for an episode without angels or demons in it. After Family Remains I feel a lot better now. I think if Family Remains had followed an episode that I had actually enjoyed, I would judge it differently. It isn't the most interesting or suspenseful episode ever, that's for sure, but it gave me what I wanted.

                  Originally posted by Cori View Post
                  Maybe but then the next MOTW episodes need to be a lot more interesting and gripping than this one, otherwise I feel this otherwise awesome season will lose momentum for me. However, I do try to have faith in the writers that this won't happen.
                  I am all for the MotW being more gripping and especially for the brothers sharing more screentime, since Family Remains was very Dean centric and Sam was more in the background. I just ... need the show to slow down and give me more quality time with the boys. At the moment everyone seems to be very confident about an early S5 pickup, so that should give them the opportunity to just return to their usual narrative patterns.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by galathea View Post
                    ROFL I couldn't even bring myself to rewatch Heaven and Hell over the hiatus. I think no other SN episode ever threw me off the show like that one. For me it felt like the show lost the core of what it is about and I was desperate for an episode without angels or demons in it.
                    LOL it's funny how one episode could be viewed so differently. Heaven and Hell is definitely one of my favourite s4 eps so far.

                    After Family Remains I feel a lot better now. I think if Family Remains had followed an episode that I had actually enjoyed, I would judge it differently. It isn't the most interesting or suspenseful episode ever, that's for sure, but it gave me what I wanted.
                    Yeah and maybe if I hadn't enjoyed Heaven and Hell so much, I could have appreciated Family Remains more. As it is, this week's episode felt kinda anti-climatic to me.

                    I am all for the MotW being more gripping and especially for the brothers sharing more screentime, since Family Remains was very Dean centric and Sam was more in the background. I just ... need the show to slow down and give me more quality time with the boys.
                    Yes poor Sam has been pushed into the background again. Hopefully, the next few episodes will explore his state of mind in detail.

                    At the moment everyone seems to be very confident about an early S5 pickup, so that should give them the opportunity to just return to their usual narrative patterns.
                    Oooh I didn't know that, that's very good news! Let's hope the CW doesn't make another stupid decision and will really give the show a 5th season.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cori View Post
                      Oooh I didn't know that, that's very good news! Let's hope the CW doesn't make another stupid decision and will really give the show a 5th season.
                      Yeah, every interview I read in the last couple of weeks from writers, directors and producers, they were all very confident. Hell, even Ostroff stated: "We've been creatively really happy with the show. The show's been holding its own. I hope it continues to do well because I'd love to see it back." I was sure the apocalypse is near when I read that. I guess it all depends a bit on the stability of the ratings though, but at the moment I am optimistic.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X