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2.09 Complications

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  • 2.09 Complications

    Ahh! How can there not be a thread yet?! I know beginning at the week it's easy to get behind with all the other shows airing, but surely I'm not the only one loving this season.

    For me there was a rough patch at the beginning of the season with episodes 2 and 3. But since then it has really amped up into the show it was last year with both action, symbolism and foreshadowing. The last 3 or 4 episodes in particular.

    Let me first say, what a surprise it was that Ellison is the one that dug up the Terminator body. And then took it to Weaver!!! So this officially makes Ellison an enemy right? Even if he may have the best of intentions, he must have no true understanding or faith in the Connor family. He must still consider them whackjobs.

    I loved the end of the scene after John and Cameron confront Ellison. John believes him, which I did too. But Cameron was apparently right, but still submits to John's orders and doesn't kill him...She flips him off his back like the turtle to show she has compassion! Omg, I about died at the hilarity but soft truth of it. Bravo Show, Bravo.

    The dreams were extremely twisty and the three dots appropriately intriguing. I'm not sure if we were supposed to recognize the name at the end (I'm very bad with names on this show) or if it was just the fact that her dream was leading her to the wall of names.

    I'm very glad that Sarah's dreams have come to the show. Not that they are prophetic, but that it shows the complexity of how instinct subconsciously interacts with all the elements we know to comprehend and reveal a truth obscured to us.

    Lydia made the punch!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ehlwyen View Post
    Let me first say, what a surprise it was that Ellison is the one that dug up the Terminator body. And then took it to Weaver!!! So this officially makes Ellison an enemy right? Even if he may have the best of intentions, he must have no true understanding or faith in the Connor family. He must still consider them whackjobs.
    I don't think that is necessarily true. I think that he realizes that the Connors are on a mission to save mankind, and that they are not exactly willing to let him be apart of that. And he wants to try and help to avert catastrophe of Judgment Day...the only thing he can seem to do is to ally with Weaver. It's his own fault for putting so much trust in her. And his intentions are good. I think that he thinks he is protecting himself and Weaver and others by keeping his alliance with her a secret. But we all know good intentions are a dangerous thing. Sometimes they blind you to other threats that swarm around you.

    I love Ellison though. I'm so glad he's gotten some richer material to work with this season.


    And I have to say I am very excited for the episode tomorrow night because I read the description and it sounds intriguing! I definitely want to know more about Cameron. They keep inserting all these tiny scenes and bits of dialogue to show she is different. And this ep did that as well, as she and John are driving and she has her foot out the window and she says says "she wouldn't be very valuable if she weren't able to feel." (paraphrased)
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jenni Lou View Post
      I don't think that is necessarily true. I think that he realizes that the Connors are on a mission to save mankind, and that they are not exactly willing to let him be apart of that. And he wants to try and help to avert catastrophe of Judgment Day...the only thing he can seem to do is to ally with Weaver. It's his own fault for putting so much trust in her. And his intentions are good. I think that he thinks he is protecting himself and Weaver and others by keeping his alliance with her a secret. But we all know good intentions are a dangerous thing. Sometimes they blind you to other threats that swarm around you.

      I love Ellison though. I'm so glad he's gotten some richer material to work with this season.
      Very true. His storyline actually adds to Connor/future storyline. Last year, he was on the outside trying to place experiences into a real world comprehension. For me, sci-fi works best being on the inside, trying to see the world through this alterna-view. So Ellison's understandings seemed very simple and did not have the humor they needed to add a new level to the show.

      Onto this season, you bring up some really good points. He's not truly the enemy since he wouldn't do anything purposely hurt them. But he is taking things out of his own hands and putting them into someone elses...a private corporation nonetheless, who has no higher authority than the desires of Weaver.

      Now, the interesting thing is, we don't really know how bad (for the future of humanity) Weaver is. It's entirely possible that her model's construction is solely dependent upon John as a leader to the resistance. That without the struggle between humans, a model of her level of intelligence and desire for human understanding, will never be developed.

      So good perhaps good for the safety of John Connor, and perhaps bad for humanity, since the nuclear war and subsequent struggle of machines v. humanity still has to happen.

      It's all so exciting, I can't wait for tomorrow. I don't think I even remember what happened on the preview for this week.

      Lydia made the punch!

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      • #4
        I don't remember the preview trailer at all. But description:

        Spoiler:
        She never sleeps, so what does she do at night? Cameron's surprising, secret life is revealed. Also, history is forever changed when a Terminator is sent back to the wrong time in the "Self Made Man" episode of TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES airing Monday, Nov. 24 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (SCC-212) (TV-14 L, V)


        Awesome.

        One thing I really like about the show is that they directly address the "paradox" issue. Case in point, with "Complications" and Charles Fischer. (And how ironic that he ends up in prison because of what his future self does in the present? ) They don't take the whole timeline issue too seriously, because if they did, the entire story would unravel before it even began. And Derek even sees that he is making tiny changes, so much so that he believes that the future Jesse has come from is different from the one he left. And to me, that is cool. It's not as if people just vanish, as they would in Back to the Future view of the space-time continuum. I am having trouble articulating right now. But s2 has been rather satisfying.
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        • #5
          Oh you are so right! I totally forgot that the Charlie Fischer stuff was in this episode. I thought that was so good.

          For me, I love the freedom the show has regarding time through cause and effect. Truly we don't know exactly how time works except in the forward stream. So I appreciate the openness that the show hasn't chosen a familiar usage of how time travel works whether through disappearing characters, altered memories of people who are in the current time, or of paradoxes of the same person meeting.

          They had an opportunity to concretely show something by killing young Charlie Fischer and they chose not do it in order to keep us puzzled. Obviously, the humanity of not killing a person who hadn't done something was the most touching aspect of this gesture. But the dangling of concrete evidence in front of us and then taking it away impressed me rather than upset me. Perhaps, I also liked the notion that knowing some things comes at a price higher than we should pay.

          I also like the fact that my own past (or at least memories) can't be changed by someone else. The existence of millions of alternate timelines that cross over into each other is interesting to me though infinitely more complex than a single timeline. But more importantly, it allows for fate to exist but not be bound to it.

          Anyway it's different...and a mystery...and has my brain teased and puzzled and wanting to find out more, so that has to be good. I usually only have time to watch episodes of TSCC once, so I feel like I'm missing a lot of levels of the show.

          I had one question. I thought the older Charlie Fischer survived because he was in a regular prison. Whereas young Charlie Fischer went to a mental ward.

          So, it's different right? Even though theoretically, same result of him surviving the nuclear war.

          Also older Charlie Fischer did something to some high security computer mainframe. I wonder how this affects the machine's agenda.

          Lydia made the punch!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ehlwyen View Post
            I had one question. I thought the older Charlie Fischer survived because he was in a regular prison. Whereas young Charlie Fischer went to a mental ward.

            So, it's different right? Even though theoretically, same result of him surviving the nuclear war.

            Also older Charlie Fischer did something to some high security computer mainframe. I wonder how this affects the machine's agenda.
            I can't speculate too much. But I would assume that any incarceration will have a similar effect on the future. Being institutionalized may allow him to help the machines much like his imprisoned counterpart did. Permitting he survives Judgment Day in the first place. I just love the irony of it! I thought for sure that because the young Charles was witness to his future self and the bad things he had done/will do...that he would ensure he wouldn't follow down that path. How delicious that he was derailed in such a way!

            I have no clue what older Charles did. Clearly he was in the past for a purpose, right? Perhaps that was it. The real question for me is: is such a misanthrope that he has no problem aiding the machines in terminating mankind, or does he just feel some sense of obligation to them because they freed him from prison after the bombs dropped? It reminds me of a character in Stephen King's The Stand in which a prisoner feels indebted to the Walking Man because he saved him from dying in prison after everyone had died.
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