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Thread: Buffy Season 9 News Thread.

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    I would argue that watching the show would make this:
    consistent with the characters and the mythology they exist in.
    Alot easier...
    In fact, if a new writer should appear in any type of fandom I would naturally hope they made themself familiar with earlier work. It really, REALLY is not an unreasonable wish...
    You may not agree on others interpretation, but thinking new writers will be as good as old ones without proper research would be as strange as expecting fans who haven't read the comics write their opinions on them... These fans might sometimes they might hit the nail on the head, but noone would argue that they should read the comics to have a better understanding and more reasonable interpretations of the action, would they?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DorothyFan1 View Post
    So what is Gail Simone *assuming she accepts the challenge to do Season 9* supposed to do with Willow now, may I ask? Is she getting the ability to do *anything* she wants with Willow or does she need to follow an overall general script?
    Has a hired writer in any season of "Buffy" ever had the ability to do *anything* they want with a character, or have they always followed an overall general script?

    Everybody that writes for Season 9 is going to be following the basic outline Joss has for the story.

    Quote Originally Posted by meiter View Post
    I would argue that watching the show would make this:

    Alot easier...
    In fact, if a new writer should appear in any type of fandom I would naturally hope they made themself familiar with earlier work. It really, REALLY is not an unreasonable wish...
    You may not agree on others interpretation, but thinking new writers will be as good as old ones without proper research would be as strange as expecting fans who haven't read the comics write their opinions on them... These fans might sometimes they might hit the nail on the head, but noone would argue that they should read the comics to have a better understanding and more reasonable interpretations of the action, would they?
    My point is that a professional writer doesn't need to be that immersed in the characters to do the job that's required for them, to have good and interesting ideas. There is an editing process, after all. There is Joss who will ultimately have the last word on anything, after all. I really don't put any premium on a professional writer needing to have seen 254 broadcast hours of television to be qualified to write 3 or 4 or 5 issues of a comic book.
    Last edited by KingofCretins; 09-01-11 at 05:04 PM.

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    This statement doesn't mean anything, because nothing is based on Season 8 "only", because whether you like it or not or agree with it or not, Season 8 is based on Seasons 1 through 7.
    God really? I'm afraid some of us don't see it that way sadly. I barely recognize some of the main characters in this, but then for me Whedon seems to have left so many gaps as to why characters came to make the decisions that they did I'm not surprised really.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leyki View Post
    I do recall some conversations i had with a friend of mine who has read many comics, when i told her that Bill Willingham would be writing Angel's comics.
    She was so excited, because she knew his work and she was loving it.
    But then again, she was proven wrong, his work in Angel's issues is one of the worst of Angel's.

    So, i'll ask again, has Gail Simone ever seen the show?
    That's the most important thing for me, not her previous work and curriculum.
    Willingham's stint on ATS, was vastly superior to anything written this season. Mostly because he actually took liberties and tried to be creative with the characters. They got a chance to experience growth and change.

    I'm sorry but after a year where you had space-shagging to bring about a new reality and Twangel, saying any particular 'guest writer' has mangled other characters personalities doesn't pass the laugh test anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sueworld View Post
    God really? I'm afraid some of us don't see it that way sadly. I barely recognize some of the main characters in this, but then for me Whedon seems to have left so many gaps as to why characters came to make the decisions that they did I'm not surprised really.
    Which was the point of every other part of that post. "Some of (you) don't see it that way" because it does not conform to your interpretations of the character on things that were always subject to multiple interpretations. For example, Angel's potential for megalomania. Buffy's willingness to ignore the law. Dawn and Xander falling for each other. Spike and/or Buffy not moving heaven and earth to be together or, failing that, dwelling in total angst over being around each other and having it out right then and there. Buffy wanting Xander, Willow cheating on a partner, Buffy and a girl.

    "Some of (you)" are free not to "see it that way", but the way you see it is not authoritative in any way, shape, for form, because the things you don't see that way can reasonably be seen by others to be that way, and were, and are, and they are the people who are writing it.

    This is actually true every season -- in Season 4, for instance, there's no way Buffy would ever sleep with a guy just a few months after Angel left, let alone after just a few days! In Season 5, the mere fact of Dawn. In Season 6, Willow's addiction and Buffy's failure to just take what happened to her in cheerful stride. All of these things are identical in substance to every Season 8 complaint. It's just that with Season 8, with the medium change, and the time since Season 7, fans grew the arrogance and sense of entitlement to just never... get over it. Like every season from 2 through 7, Season 8 thwarted the anticipation and expectations about the characters and plot by parts of the audience.

    So an eminent writer in this medium like Gail Simone is connected to Season 9, and the reaction is almost immediately "wow, I hope she immediately brings the Buffyverse back in line with how I wanted it to be after 'Chosen'". There's only so many ways to spin it; that's what the complaint actually is stripped of all pretense. I think she'll be able to bring vivid and interesting stories to the Buffyverse and that having more use of experienced comic writers will help Season 9 a great deal. I'd rather have TV writers co-write these things, mostly for dialogue and some plot details rather than trying to translate their ideas into a comic script.

    EDIT: I thumbed through Willingham's stuff, and laughed my butt off. He struck me as an author that did what I cited as an example of ignoring things about which there is wide consensus in the audience, like Illyria's basic personality. It made his early pomposity toward Joss even funnier to me. I think IDW did much, much more to basically disconnect from previous work than Season 8 did, and not even on the contentious character details, but on actual mythology -- vampires by transfusion, for instance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingofCretins View Post
    Has a hired writer in any season of "Buffy" ever had the ability to do *anything* they want with a character, or have they always followed an overall general script?

    Everybody that writes for Season 9 is going to be following the basic outline Joss has for the story.



    My point is that a professional writer doesn't need to be that immersed in the characters to do the job that's required for them, to have good and interesting ideas. There is an editing process, after all. There is Joss who will ultimately have the last word on anything, after all. I really don't put any premium on a professional writer needing to have seen 254 broadcast hours of television to be qualified to write 3 or 4 or 5 issues of a comic book.
    And a reviewer on the internet doesn't really need to read the comics, but it would be better if they did.
    Also, a writer who writes based on the show would be WAY more interesting to me because their decisions would have the same origin as my pov on the Buffy-saga. Other fans pov is why I am on the net after all, and I kinda expect them to explain and clarify their pov based on common experience so I can see others pov and either broadening my horizon, or dismissing morons and feel entitled and better than others

    While a "new" writer would always feel abit off, like they can't possibly build further on the mythology if they don't know the groundwork. They would just write randomly whatever fell into their head, and would never have the same experience or the same basis of knowledge and wouldn't let me find the groundwork and the "wholeness" of the story.

    Like, even if I don't like the Xander/Dawn thing, I love finding little clues every here and there in the show that they were indeed thinking of going that way.

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    "Some of (you)" are free not to "see it that way", but the way you see it is not authoritative in any way, shape, for form, because the things you don't see that way can reasonably be seen by others to be that way, and were, and are, and they are the people who are writing it.
    And I'm afraid I see that as being really rather sad from where I'm standing. I feel theres a lot of difference between the stories and character development as seen in the live actions show compared to this parody of the verse as seen in the comics, where half the plot points only work If all the characters have lost half of their brain cells.

    I think Whedons mistake was that he thought fans of the show would embrace the new medium with open arms and his attempt at making the verse and it's characters fit in this new environment. Making Buffy and Angel into superheros complete with comic book type powers just came across to some as being utterly ridiculous and not really what the heart of the show was ever about. *looks at own sig line*

    In fact for me the nearest the entire run of season 8 came to the spirit of the show was that discussion between Xander and Buffy in one of the later issues, where the dialog read as feeling very authentic, and where nobody was attempting to chuck a train about.

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    There seem to be two completely different debates going on here:

    1) Whether new/guest writers are good for the comics/can write in the spirit of the show/can write characters well,
    2) Whether new/guest writers need to actually see the show before writing for season 9.

    The answer to the question 2) should be freaking obvious and I can't believe that we're even discussing it. Anyone who doesn't even bother to research what they're supposed to be doing professionally is a total hack. For heaven's sake, if a person watching a show for entertainment can go through several seasons of a TV show in a few months, a comic book writer whose freaking job is to do it should make an effort to do it! Suggesting that it's perfectly OK for them to write for characters without having seen all their previous CANON history is like suggesting that a professional critic should write reviews of films or books or comics they haven't seen. What do you think, is it a good idea to bring in a new writer in a TV show who hasn't watched the show at all, only read the summaries online?

    Yes, none of the writers are able to include any major plot points that haven't been approved by the editor and ultimately by Joss Whedon. But it's the responsibility of the individual writers to write DIALOGUE, to get the characters' voices right, to communicate their feelings. How are they going to do that if they aren't really familiar with those characters?!

    Quote Originally Posted by KingofCretins View Post
    As for Brian K. Vaughan, I really have no idea how much he ever did watch "Buffy" or not, nor do I care. His job is to write a story that engages an audience and is consistent with the characters and the mythology they exist in. Whether his understanding of the characters comes from careful, fervent viewing of the previous work or from a 50 word summary given to him by whoever hired him is completely irrelevant to me.
    His story was focused on Faith, so he didn't even have to watch all seasons (or maybe he did - how am I to know), but I'd say he definitely needed to watch season 3 of BtVS and Faith episodes in season 4 and 7 of BtVS and season 1 and 4 of AtS. One can do that in a few weeks. I'd be very surprised if it turns out that he wrote his issues after just reading Buffywikia page on Faith!

    And if (hypothetically) someone hired him, found out that he's never watched the show and gave him a 50 word summary without asking him to watch anything, then that someone should be immediately fired for not doing their job properly. They may get lucky one time in 10, but that doesn't change anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by hayes62 View Post
    Jeanty had never watched the show before taking on the job but started with S6 and went on to devour the whole series and is now as big a fan as any of us. Which is not to say that his opinions on who each of the characters are match every other fans - he's need a seriously fractured personality for that to be possible.
    Jeanty doesn't write, so he's under less obligation than the writers to research everything about the backstory, but he needed to see at least some of the show to be able to get characters' mannerisms and expressions right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charles View Post
    I'm sorry but after a year where you had space-shagging to bring about a new reality and Twangel, saying any particular 'guest writer' has mangled other characters personalities doesn't pass the laugh test anymore.
    Since the Twilight arc was written by a guest writer (and many people felt that they couldn't recognize Angel in his scenes - maybe as a twisted version of the Angel from seasons 1-3 of BtVS, but not as Angel from AtS), you're not really helping your case here.

    Quote Originally Posted by leyki View Post
    What worries me is that i have seen a Buffy that i don't recognize, robbing banks and doing girls and jumping on Angel after 2 minutes of fighting him.
    Now this doesn't help your point, since Buffy robbing a bank is something that Joss came up with and that was actually revealed in an issue written by him, Buffy/Satsu is something that he came up with, and space frak is a major plot point that he must have either came up with or, it was someone else's idea, agreed with.

    And what worries me is that i am going to see an Angel based on what he did in season 8,
    i am going to see a Willow who was superpowered and now has no powers,
    Well, she has no powers, that's a fact of the plot. It doesn't make any difference who writers the issues, they're going to have to deal with that fact.
    i am going to see a Spike who will just be Buffy's puppy comforting her,
    Based on what? When did that happen in season 8? Because Spike seems to be giving Buffy a pep talk in a preview panel, he is her 'puppy'? He even managed to give Harmony a pep talk in "Harm's Way".

    i am going to see a Buffy feeling bad because of what happened and what her beloved one did
    You don't know what kind of Buffy you'll see.

    Some of the things that you complain about in season 8 are things that writers from the show are responsible for, mainly Whedon. And he's still the one that has to agree on every plot point. What guest writers bring in is dialogue and details of characterization.
    You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimeTravellingBunny View Post
    Uh, how does having actually watched the entire show hinder one from being able to write the characters as they are now? That's really the strangest idea I've ever encountered on this forum. By that logic, BtVS should have had different showrunners and different writers every season. So we could all have a brand new set of characters each year with just the same names and actors. Character's history is in intrinsic part of who they are, it's what defines them. You can't write a character well if you have no clue where they come from and how they've evolved. What do you think makes you more qualified to write for Willow, for instance - just knowing that "she's a powerful witch who's lost her powers and whose previous girlfriend was killed" as you've figured out from S8, or that she's a powerful witch who's just lost her powers and who used to be an insecure nerd who felt insignificant in school and still hadn't gotten over those issues years later, and who went dark and tried to destroy the world after her girlfriend was killed? To really be able to write the characters, the minimal qualifications you have to meet is to have seen all of seasons 1-7 and read all of season 8 (including the one-shots and supplementary comics) - in other words, everything that is canon. Saying that "they don't have the time because they're professionals" is the most absurd thing ever. They have to have time for it because they're professionals! It's their frakking job! And they should make an effort not to be sloppy about it. If the fans can do it - and many people have been able to go through 7 seasons of a TV show in just a few months, despite having jobs or school/college to devote time to - then certainly someone whose job is to do that should be able to do it, too!
    Wow, that isn't what I said at all. But this is the "Season 8" section, I should expect nothing less than someone not actually reading something. What I was saying (bolded for tl; dr) was, if I had a choice between Gail Simone watching the show and reading the comics to base her "Season 9" writing on, with her just doing research by reading synopsis and glancing over episodes/transcript of the TV series, I would rather her read the comics, because it is more inline with the characters now. I am not saying she shouldn't at least know the character's pre-comic history, because yes, that is very important, but watching EVERY SINGLE episode of the show is completely unnecessary. I don't need her to watch 'Beer Bad' or 'The Puppet Show' or 'Him' to write "Season 9" effectively.

    Quote Originally Posted by sueworld View Post
    God really? I'm afraid some of us don't see it that way sadly. I barely recognize some of the main characters in this, but then for me Whedon seems to have left so many gaps as to why characters came to make the decisions that they did I'm not surprised really.
    Well, to be fair, there was a time-gap between Season 7 and "Season 8." It's not like the show picked-up the day after 'Chosen.' It was years. The characters were older and did stuff between the seasons that could seriously effect how they look at things now. Did Joss "God" Whedon do a good job exploring what happened between Season 7 and "Season 8?" No, he did not. A lot of show do this, though. They throw viewers into an entirely new element with little explanation to how we got there.

    Quote Originally Posted by sueworld View Post
    And I'm afraid I see that as being really rather sad from where I'm standing. I feel theres a lot of difference between the stories and character development as seen in the live actions show compared to this parody of the verse as seen in the comics, where half the plot points only work If all the characters have lost half of their brain cells.

    I think Whedons mistake was that he thought fans of the show would embrace the new medium with open arms and his attempt at making the verse and it's characters fit in this new environment. Making Buffy and Angel into superheros complete with comic book type powers just came across to some as being utterly ridiculous and not really what the heart of the show was ever about. *looks at own sig line*

    In fact for me the nearest the entire run of season 8 came to the spirit of the show was that discussion between Xander and Buffy in one of the later issues, where the dialog read as feeling very authentic, and where nobody was attempting to chuck a train about.
    TV Series /=/ Comic Series.

    It's interesting you bring up the quote in your signature, because, honestly, I never took it the way you seem to be taking it. I've always read it as this, "Buffy" is now a comic. So, all of the show fans who expect it to be the TV Series as a comic, aren't going to always get what the "need." The way the story is told is vastly different. We know this because it is different. The comics had no 'Go Fish' or 'Beer Bad' or any other of the constant fillers that served as a breather for the fans, especially during mythology centric seasons. All of the issues are important to the main story in some way or another. It's not like with 'Beer Bad' or 'Go Fish' where fans actually skip the episodes, because THEY CAN AND THOSE EPISODES HAVE NO EFFECT ON THE OVERALL ARC. Each issue was a piece to a big puzzle that is "Season 8."

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    Well, she has no powers, that's a fact of the plot. It doesn't make any difference who writers the issues, they're going to have to deal with that fact.
    I'm reading Willow's situation like this: My main worry is Season 9 will be abruptly different in tone from Season 8 and we won't get the *context* of what Willow might be doing next season after the results of this season.

    In other words it's non episodic TV syndrome again. Or Buffy devolves into a simple procedural crime drama with some monsters to kill each week. You can dive into any episode of any season and not worry about what happened before because there's no need to understand the context.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
    Wow, that isn't what I said at all. But this is the "Season 8" section, I should expect nothing less than someone not actually reading something. What I was saying (bolded for tl; dr) was, if I had a choice between Gail Simone watching the show and reading the comics to base her "Season 9" writing on, with her just doing research by reading synopsis and glancing over episodes/transcript of the TV series, I would rather her read the comics, because it is more inline with the characters now. I am not saying she shouldn't at least know the character's pre-comic history, because yes, that is very important, but watching EVERY SINGLE episode of the show is completely unnecessary. I don't need her to watch 'Beer Bad' or 'The Puppet Show' or 'Him' to write "Season 9" effectively.
    And do you need her to watch 'Becoming', 'The Gift' or 'Chosen', or do you think she can do without those, too? Just curious.
    You keep waiting for the dust to settle and then you realize it; the dust is your life going on. If happy comes along - that weird unbearable delight that's actual happy - I think you have to grab it while you can. You take what you can get, 'cause it's here, and then...gone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TimeTravellingBunny View Post
    And do you need her to watch 'Becoming', 'The Gift' or 'Chosen', or do you think she can do without those, too? Just curious.
    That really depends. 'Chosen,' defiantly. 'The Gift,' maybe. Depends on the themes of "Season 9." Truly understanding Buffy's motivation in 'The Gift' may not be completely necessarily in "Season 9." If Gail Simone understands the characters and can understand their motivations in "Season 9," that is what matters most. Can she write Buffy in "Season 9" is what matters, not can she write Buffy in Season 1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
    That really depends. 'Chosen,' defiantly. 'The Gift,' maybe. Depends on the themes of "Season 9." Truly understanding Buffy's motivation in 'The Gift' may not be completely necessarily in "Season 9." If Gail Simone understands the characters and can understand their motivations in "Season 9," that is what matters most. Can she write Buffy in "Season 9" is what matters, not can she write Buffy in Season 1.
    But by picking and choosing episodes are more worthwhile than others...one may be missing some important insights into the characters. For instance, you mention the "theme" of Season 9.

    Well, magic has just been totally destroyed. Willow's purpose has been crushed. But to understand where she's coming from...you'd have to include Hush (the beginning of Willow and Tara), The Body (another big episode), Normal Again, The Gift (so this episode really *is* crucial to understanding Buffy and Willow), Seeing Red(crucial to understanding Dark Willow and Buffy/Spike), Conversations with Dead People (understanding Willow's vulnerabilities) for starters. Gail Simone or anyone else who takes the job would need to understand the context of the characters motivations. So it does become important.
    Last edited by DorothyFan1; 09-01-11 at 10:58 PM.

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    A writer doesn't need to know every corner of every character's back story to tell the planned and specific story over 3 or 4 or even 10 issues of Season 9, they just don't.

    Do you seriously figure that Brad Meltzer's arc would have been better if (assuming he hasn't) he'd seen "I Robot, You Jane"? That there was some vital insight into Buffy's personality tucked away in there that he is fundamentally less qualified to tell that story if he hasn't seen it than if he had? I don't think that at all. I think it's pretty doubtful, in fact, and it's only MORE doubtful the more episodes and seasons we're talking about.

    For argument's sake, go to Season 2 -- do you figure that it's a sure thing that Ty King ("Passion") had seen every aired episode before he wrote that? Or that Diego Gutierrez ("Normal Again") had seen all of the previous episodes before he wrote his? I'm going to guess that we could go through the series on TV, find every time a new writer came aboard and you're going to find half or more that had not in fact seen all of "Buffy" prior to writing their episode.

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    A writer doesn't need to know every corner of every character's back story to tell the planned and specific story over 3 or 4 or even 10 issues of Season 9, they just don't.
    Not all of them, just the key stories that have had significant impact on the key characters. Shows have 'bibles' which help inform new writers about such things, so some folks must think It's important to know what went on in previous seasons.

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    A writer having huge gaps in knowledge of a character's backstory leads to glaring mistakes (and contradictions in canon). A character's history informs who they are. And frankly, considering how much Season 8 relies on past knowledge, a writer who only read Season 8 but didn't watch the series would have no clue what was going on (like a fan who'd only watched Serenity but never watched Firefly not really understanding why everyone in the theater gasped when Wash... ahem--and that was just a short season of backstory missed).

    When Angel pulled off the mask, who cares? When Ethan died, who cares? Who is this stranger? Without the backstory context (which the comics rely on because they're a continuation of the show, let's not pretend the comics are completely separate), the characterization lacks important dimension.

    To suggest that Gail Simone could do a peachy keen job without actually watching the series is pretty ridiculous.

    As for Vaughan, he'd been pitching a Faith movie to Whedon for years and had been a fan for even longer. So if anyone hopes for a new comics writer who writes an incredible arc that shows a nuanced, deep understanding of the characters and presents them in such a way that we the audience gain new insight, then you'd best hope they watch the series. I mean, seriously. Even Scott Allie rewatched the back half of Season 7 when he wrote for Last Gleaming, all in preparation. And that was after he'd already watched the entire series. (Cue snark about Scott Allie.) Scott Allie rewatched the series when he's been elbow deep in creating Season 8. So yeah, the series is the foundation and you don't ignore it or take it for granted.

    Look at Drew Goddard coming on the scene in Season 7. He wrote 'Selfless' where he included a shoutout to Becoming. You'd best believe he knew the series like the back of his hand. He demonstrates his fannish knowledge in his scripts later on with the Faith vs. Vulcan joke in Dirty Girls. And let's all recognize that he was one of the best parts of Season 7. So if we want a new writer who's actually good at writing the Whedonverse, let's hope for a Goddard or a Vaughan who really know the characters, the 'verse, and the history--on top of being extremely talented.

    New writers who are fans of the entire series often enter the scene with fresh ideas. And uninformed writers will enter with fresh ideas, too--they'll just be ideas that don't resonate with the characters we know because you actually have to know someone, not just have a passing acquaintance with them where you're making blind guesses 'cause you're in the dark about who they are (like a person not knowing Buffy's mother died in "The Body", those experiences are what make the story resonate, they're building blocks, not background fodder to be ignored at will).

    I could break this down to therapy terms. When you go see a therapist, the first thing they want to know is about your formative experiences like your childhood, your family, etc. Gail Simone needs to know about the formative experiences of the characters to understand them fully and those formative experiences mostly happened in the TV series. To suggest that she can write them in a three-dimensional manner without actually knowing where they come from... it's counterintuitive. I'm feeling a great big DUH coming on here.

    Why in the world would we not want her to watch the series and know the backstory? And how much you wanna bet that she'll need to watch the series to get the voices down?
    Last edited by Emmie; 10-01-11 at 01:19 AM.

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    Thank God some people posted here their opinions as well,
    because yesterday i was starting feeling stupid or something when i said that i want a writer who has seen or will see the series than one who hasn't or will just get some summaries and the reactions that i received....

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    What? KingofCretins's Avatar
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    You want that for a writer, fair enough. But it's not a realistic expectation, I tend to think it does not represent the industry standard for writers of serial fiction on TV or in comics, and I definitely don't think it's a plausible prerequisite to write for such fiction, nor do I think the Buffyverse is uniquely important that it deserves that type of consideration when it was never expected that, for instance, a "Star Trek" writer had seen every episode, or a new "X-Files" writer in later seasons, etc.

    I really would love to survey every writer who joined Mutant Enemy to write in the Buffyverse after Season 1 and find out how many of the TV writers fail to live up to this very heightened standard, and had not seen every available episode of the show at the time they started writing for it. If I were to place money, I'd bet fewer than half had.

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    But why wouldn't they? If I just got a gig for writing a TV show you best believe I'd be going straight to the DVD store and watching every single episode I could before starting. You'd want to know as much about the series as possible, especially on a show like BtVS where one of Whedon's mantras is to constantly reflect back on past events to shape how the character's progress. That just seems like common sense to me.

    I'd be very, very surprised if all the writers on the show hadn't seen every episode before. We know for a fact Vaughn was a big fan of BtVS because he said so himself, so was Goddard before getting the gig. I don't buy that it's somehow an "unrealistic expectation" for the people writing the show to actually watch all the episodes. If all the fans can do it (and it's not like they don't have jobs and other life commitments too) then the writers certainly can. BtVS IS their job so they can consider it their homework or whatever. If the writer is truly passionate about this verse then I don’t really get why they wouldn’t want to watch all the episodes, either.
    Last edited by vampmogs; 10-01-11 at 02:02 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vampmogs View Post
    But why wouldn't they? If I just got a gig for writing a TV show you best believe I'd be going straight to the DVD store and watching every single episode I could before starting. You'd want to know as much about the series as possible, especially on a show like BtVS where one of Whedon's mantras is to constantly reflect back on past events to shape how the character's progress. That just seems like common sense to me.
    Not necessarily. I would want to get the creators take on the characters before I started forming my own opinions that would forever affect the way I wrote those characters. I can see an argument for both methods though so I'm not saying your approach would be wrong.
    The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it. -- Albert Einstein

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