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Thread: Doctor Who

  1. #321
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    She isn't a character, she's a plot device. Her entire arc has been about the mystery of who and what she is, rather than about her journey with the Doctor, and I'm sure the payoff will be thrilling and all that, but I'd much rather have spent the half-season getting to know her as a person instead. ;confused:
    That's the problem also with River Song, who I can't stand.

    Under RTD, the companions and their families were real people with real lives and relationships, normal - even average - people thrown into amazing adventures. Their normality helped keep the show balanced and grounded.

    Moffat on the other hands writes his characters, as you said, not as people but as plot devices in his convoluted and frankly tiring "boombastic" (and nonsensical) plots. The greater everything gets in scope, the more superficial I feel the show gets, and the less I care.

    I was looking forward to Clara, but since she's so underdeveloped I couldn't care less about her.

    I hope we are in for a regeneration, and most importantly, for a change of showrunner sooner than later.

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  3. #322
    Agent 1.3 Llywela's Avatar
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    I can see what Moffat is doing, most of the time, and I can usually see why he shapes his stories the way he does. He loves to paint pictures with very broad brushstrokes across grand, sweeping vistas, big and bold and dramatic, and he's finally getting the chance to realise all the clever ideas he's probably had simmering away since he watched the show when he was a little boy...

    And I'm sure there are a lot of people out there who enjoy that style of storytelling, all tell and very little show - his era certainly has its fans.

    For me, though, I don't enjoy broad brushstrokes storytelling. I prefer closer detail work, small-scale and intimate. I want to see the development unfold, not simply be told that it has happened.

    And, you know, if we're contrasting Moffat with RTD, even the classic companions, as a rule, had far more fully formed personalities than Clara (and Amy, tbh). We know plenty about Clara's backstory - but backstory doesn't give a character personality, however much it can be used to support and develop an established personality, and unfortunately we know painfully little about who Clara is as a person (and what we do know, I'm not keen on - she comes across as self-important and over-confident). I could reel off a list of classic companions who were never given any backstory at all, yet I could tell you reams about who they were as individuals - a stark contrast to Clara, who has the backstory but very little individuality.

    Moffat is a good writer and a strong storyteller, but his style isn't best-suited to Doctor Who, I feel, and I'm more than ready for a new era, now.

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  5. #323
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    http://www.spoilertv.com/2013/05/doc...-series-8.html

    There's going to be a season 8, always with Matt as the Doctor.

    I'm not happy. Nothing against Matt, but I'm tired of Eleven.

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  6. #324
    The Dark Avenger NileQT87's Avatar
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    I'm still unsure about that because of the shaved haircut. It's more than a little severe! If Matt is staying on, there's no way they can start filming until next year. Which is already a problem as they still have a Christmas special to get in the can starting in August, while Matt has to have his head shaved until July. He's basically either going to have to be bewigged or adopting the cropped Eccleston haircut (which does not look good on his big head).

    Also, they're filming a whopping total of 2 episodes this whole year. That's just piss poor and I'm sick of Moffat's continuous hiatuses and split series now because of all the script delays. So, after November and December getting two specials, we're probably going to have to wait until fall again (and let's hope they don't try to split it to fall 2014 and spring 2015 again--that would just be painful).

    The only good thing coming out that is remotely reassuring is that the new executive producer, Brian Minchin, is one of RTD's people from the early series that went on to do SJA when that started up. Moffat can't hold onto his executive producers, though (I have a feeling from the rumors that his period's behind-the-scenes difficulties are going to be tumultuous DVD fodder someday when everyone's old and doesn't care about hurting anyone's long-dead career). It's hard to miss that there aren't any commentaries in the Moffat era, while the Tennant part of the RTD era had everyone acting like a big, happy family that loved each other to bits (while Eccleston seems to have left over how crew was treated, it's also hard to miss how everyone who worked with him adores Tennant a lot more--and going by the story Tennant told of RTD coming over to his house to show him Rose and Dalek while filming Casanova and letting out the big secret that Eccleston had just left and he was desperately trying to recast the role--Tennant never auditioned--it seems that RTD wasn't actually thrilled with having to recast at a moment's notice). You also get very different commentaries from, say, the happy, happy Second Doctor family (the U.N.I.T. family is also pretty happy, happy, too--the commentaries are equally full of positivity and Katy being her batty self... and despite the Hartnell health troubles--Nick Courtney, in particular, had a problematic incident with Hartnell, while Purves, in particular, glows about him... it's another era that doesn't seem to really dwell on problems) vs. JN-T-era troubles when the show was heading off the rails fast (whinging about Matthew Waterhouse being a plentiful example--Lalla, Peter and Janet, in particular). There's even a split there, too, between happy behind-the-scenes eras where people are effusively glowing about each other and ones that let their troubles be known. Caroline Skinner's leaving (or very public firing), in particular, has some very scandalous rumors going around about it--it'll be interesting how true that will be revealed to be in a few decades. The Classic era doesn't really hide behind PR (good God, Tom Baker's autobiography alone!--granted, his image is very much shaped by him being "Mad Tom"--he was having intimate encounters with fangirl groupies in costume! ...and let's not even get into the creepy sexual escapades that JN-T and especially his partner--not all wanted advances, either--were doing at conventions and on BBC property! O.o).

    If there's any hope for series 8, it's RTD-era Brian Minchin as the new executive producer. It's also a bit noticeable that the next exec is a guy after the rumors going around about the nature of Caro's firing. The 50th had an emergency exec producer position fill-in by a BBC higher up. Piers Wenger and Beth Willis apparently got in trouble for going over budget (is it just me or did Piers look heavily medicated/drugged in all of his interviews?). Caro was enthusiastic and knowledgeable about the show's history, but never really looked happy. Granted, RTD and Julie Gardner looked like two-peas-in-a-pod all the time. Julie really bubbled with positivity. It's also notable that she went on to run BBC Worldwide, which is promoting the 50th anniversary more than the BBC at present (not to mention the new BBC people who got rid of Confidential and BBC America's attempts to keep it going with behind-the-scenes/Best Of... specials). RTD even saved Big Finish's DW license from clueless BBC people (RTD intervened and said he'd deal with it when the subject was broached, rather than let it be known that Big Finish had the license to produce a shedload of audio stories with the Classic Doctors that would be running beside the new Doctors).

    There's been a lot of statements made recently regarding BBC Wales refusing to take any criticism over how DW is being treated at the moment with all the hiatuses and script problems. There have been numerous thread deletions over on Gallifrey Base of Moffat's PR team asking things to be taken down regarding the Caroline Skinner rumors, the cover-up over the fact that one series was being split over two years (which was revealed by a Private Eye article that was proven to be almost entirely accurate, while Moffat denied it furiously), etc... PR is actually starting to intrude with censorship on Gallifrey Base. And then there was the recent kerfluffle with Ian Levine's worries over what the hell the show is doing with reduced episode count (let's remember that seasons 23-26 were half the length of previous DW seasons in the Classic era and it was a huge sign of the show going off the rails--not to mention the show having a massive cancellation/hiatus between seasons 22 and 23) and scripts vs. the PR team saying that it is going to be the biggest year ever for DW over and over again like a broken record. And now Waris Hussein, Peter Purves and Anneke Wills are starting to pipe up with having issues with the current show (I don't actually agree with all of their points, though--Waris, in particular--I hate JN-T's asexual Doctor and NA Lungbarrow Looms crap--hello, Waris, remember that story you directed with the Doctor's granddaughter?!). Though I certainly prefer the serious way RTD wrote women and romance in comparison to how Moffat handles it.

    Speaking of which, Moffat did tone down the comedy big time in this last episode. The utter lack of tension created by nobody letting the show remain serious was killing series 7b. I hope the tone is more serious and the drama played straight for series 8, as the show's tone was getting way too wacky and sitcom-like starting with A Christmas Carol (series 6 and 7 both suffered repeatedly from this to the point where Eleven was becoming an unbearable mood-killer--not to mention River!). Now just to fix that 'show, don't tell' problem that Moffat's writing is suffering from (though his series 7 efforts did improve over series 6). Gatiss is currently the fan darling of the series 7 writers because of his darker tone--who thought *that* would happen?! Asylum and Crimson were probably the most successful for me this series.

    New video with Matt and David: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Em8lmmTNkA&hd=1

    I must say... Seeing David back for the 50th is something I'm so thrilled about that it quashes quite a lot of the misgivings I have about the production and writers. Tom, Peter, Colin, Sylvester and Paul still deserve to be there more than 8.5 John Hurt (well, that kills the old people age argument!--some of the Classic Docs are positively spry next to him, chest-poppingly famous as he is--though Bernard Cribbins already shattered the octogenarian companion glass ceiling in a completely active role), though, as intriguing as that is. I could really have done without the on-screen caption, though. That was just tacky. It should have been a fade-to-black credits caption card, not an on-screen one, no matter how famous he is. Then again, I don't like burned-in credits over video content at all (incl. the post-opening credits production people getting their names burned into episodes--it kills those sequences for fanvidders!).

    Though if William Russell shows up in the anniversary (his name is on the Coal Hill School signage that they were filming with), I'll gladly eat extra helpings of humble pie. Interestingly, Classic Doctors and companions have been wholly absent from the Doctor Who Magazine comics since the show came back (so much so that the original plan of having McGann regenerate in comic form into Eccleston was denied due to the fact that it would mean that Destrii was Nine's first companion), but Ian and Barbara are currently in a comic arc with the Eleventh Doctor for the anniversary. The BBC typically doesn't allow that sort of thing (IDW had no interest in the Brigadier comic by one of its paid artists, as well, which is why it became a fan project on DeviantArt with a Sarah Jane sequel), because it distracts from the current Doctor/companion team they're using the magazine to advertise. So, having Ian and Barbara there is rather unusual as something that would get past the BBC higher-ups, unless it does tie into the show in some way. The Coal Hill School signage might be why it was allowed.

    The assumption about that David/Matt interview clip referring to someone who is bemused by Ten and Eleven both in and out of character is assumed to be John Hurt (which certainly fits his personality), but that doesn't really gel with the fact that David and Matt specifically mention that he is somebody they aren't allowed to name (and John Hurt was announced right along with David and Billie due to the very public filming they did--though Billie wasn't particularly publicly seen!)... So that "bemused" person might not be Hurt. 88-year-old William Russell is definitely a possibility--and he'd definitely be bemused by two younger actors playing the Doctor, as his Doctor was an old man while *he* was in the leading man hero role! It's extremely peculiar that the BBC would allow Ian and Barbara to be companions in the official magazine comic, despite them allowing IDW to do a comic for every Doctor, as well (though IDW has already pretty much done that before with The Forgotten in Ten's era).

    The BBC are obsessed with the tie-in material only featuring what is meaningful to the current production, same with them refusing Big Finish to play with any toys that coincide with the current show plans (at one point, they didn't allow them to use the Sontarans right before they returned). The BBC also forced Babelcolour to take down his long-uploaded Ten Doctors project just this year rather close to the timing of the series finale (Babelcolour is famous for colorizing Hartnell and Troughton clips--so much so that he was hired to colorize an entire episode of The Mind of Evil for the official DVD range!--and rotoscoping the Doctors into shared adventures with each other--and he does a helluva better job than the BBC just did!--for one thing, he wouldn't have forgotten to deinterlace the Tom Baker clip... that was embarrassing!). The BBC just did the same to the other fan's Youtube animé ass-kicking Pertwee project just as he was hired to animate missing episodes. The BBC typically only cares about what's on Youtube when it interferes with something they're about to release or the person goes on their payroll.

    Babelcolour was allowed to retain his trailers, at least: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8-1XtQwHpM&hd=1 & https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HS8MEmtsbBA&hd=1

    More Babelcolour here: http://babelcolour.com/

    And his improvement to the BBC's efforts yesterday!:



    Last edited by NileQT87; 20-05-13 at 09:58 AM.

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  8. #325
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    Nile, I read on Tumblr (although I don't have a confirmation for that) that season 8 will air in late 2014, meaning that we have more than a year and a half to wait; a good year after the November 50th Anniversary special. Matt's hair will have the time to grow again.

    Between my lack of investment in the current version of the show and all these endless hiatuses, I can easily see my interest waning while I wait and wait and wait.

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  9. #326
    Agent 1.3 Llywela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NileQT87 View Post
    If Matt is staying on, there's no way they can start filming until next year. Which is already a problem as they still have a Christmas special to get in the can starting in August, while Matt has to have his head shaved until July. He's basically either going to have to be bewigged or adopting the cropped Eccleston haircut (which does not look good on his big head).
    Or maybe Matt's hair grows really fast and it'll look fine by the time they start filming – it's not for a few months yet.

    Also, they're filming a whopping total of 2 episodes this whole year. That's just piss poor and I'm sick of Moffat's continuous hiatuses and split series now because of all the script delays. So, after November and December getting two specials, we're probably going to have to wait until fall again (and let's hope they don't try to split it to fall 2014 and spring 2015 again--that would just be painful).
    Tell me about it – I don't understand what's going on with the reduction of episodes and split seasons. Didn't Moffat claim at one time that we were going to get more Who than ever in 2013? Yeah, we really, really aren't. Not even a full season. In the anniversary year. Badly, badly done, and for no good reason. Is Moffat spreading himself too thin? If so he needs to let something go, instead of doing half a job – either commit fully or get out.

    Now just to fix that 'show, don't tell' problem that Moffat's writing is suffering from
    Oh, don't get me started on that one!

    I must say... Seeing David back for the 50th is something I'm so thrilled about that it quashes quite a lot of the misgivings I have about the production and writers. Tom, Peter, Colin, Sylvester and Paul still deserve to be there more than 8.5 John Hurt (well, that kills the old people age argument!--some of the Classic Docs are positively spry next to him, chest-poppingly famous as he is--though Bernard Cribbins already shattered the octogenarian companion glass ceiling in a completely active role), though, as intriguing as that is.
    I still have misgivings, and pretty serious ones. I'm really looking forward to it and am sure I'll enjoy watching it – and I feel a lot better about it now that the season finale has provided the set-up, which means we at least aren't going into it cold. But…well, we'll see.

    Though if William Russell shows up in the anniversary (his name is on the Coal Hill School signage that they were filming with), I'll gladly eat extra helpings of humble pie.
    Oh, I could forgive almost anything else if I could get to see Eleven meeting the now-elderly Ian and calling him 'my dear boy' one last time! Well, we can wish.


    Now, as far as the season finale goes…I have such mixed feelings I hardly know where to begin. I've been trying to digest it for two days now and I'm still not sure. There was so much that I loved – I loved seeing all the old Doctors in a new episode and don't really care about the quality of the techniques used to paste them into the new footage, it was just a thrill to see. I enjoyed the episode as a whole, it answered and allayed a lot of my misgivings, and I really loved the sneaky way they got around having to say the Doctor's name, that was very clever – I especially loved the split second where you can see the Great Intelligence thinking 'his name is Please???' It was a clever story, as per standard with the Moffat era.

    But there's always a but. Moffat's era is clever, but lacking in heart. I still don't feel any connection to Clara as a person, certainly not enough for her sacrifice to have any real meaning. We've been told, repeatedly, how perfect and wonderful she is, but we've been given nothing to connect to at an emotional level. She hasn't had a journey, she just slid into the role of The Perfect Companion as if she had absolutely nothing to learn (and she hasn't learnt anything, she hasn't needed to, she was already perfect, supposedly). She feels like a by-the-numbers construction of what The Cool Companion should be, rather than a character constructed as a whole person - her every action is 'what would The Cool Companion Do rather than What Would Clara Do. We haven't seen her relationship with the Doctor grow – they were strangers one minute and bosom buddies the next - we certainly haven't seen enough of how the Doctor came to be so attached to her, other than the mystery (I get that he's very protective of her having seen her die twice already, but that's a level of attachment that's about him not her). And yet she is meant to be just an ordinary girl. All that 'I was born to save the Doctor' might be true of her copies scattered through space and time but it isn't true of this Clara, or shouldn't be. All season I've been wondering if the reason we've seen so little of these adventures from Clara's POV was because there was some big twist coming that would explain why we couldn't be allowed to get to know her as a person properly, but there wasn't. Her story in the finale would have been enhanced so, so very much if she'd had an emotional journey like Rose in series 1 to lead into it.

    I also have very mixed feelings about Clara being scattered through space and time to save the Doctor, however much I loved seeing all those old Doctors again. For one thing, it smacks of Moffat once again using a plot contrivance to make HIS companion more significant in the Doctor's life than anyone else has ever been (as opposed to, say, taking the time to build the character and her relationship with the Doctor so that we'd fall in love with her naturally). For another, although it sounds cool in theory, it just doesn't work for me, logically, when I try to think about how it actually works in practice. Victorian Clara and Dalek Oswin both had to meet and interact with the Doctor in order to save his life, and neither of them knew who they really were – neither of them had the experience Clara described in the finale of always running after the Doctor, always knowing that she had to save him. Are we now supposed to believe that incarnations of this ordinary human girl have been on the fringes of every adventure he's ever had, consciously and deliberately saving him, single-handedly and off-screen, without him ever having known about it (and without her even knowing what she was really doing or why)? That diminishes the Doctor that we've known all these years in order to build Clara up, which, when you also factor in how often we've been told of her perfection, quite frankly smacks of Mary Sue-ism. And what exactly was she saving him from all those times? The Great Intelligence was in Victorian Clara's story, but at an earlier time in its own timeline – and it had nothing to do with the Dalek Asylum at all. So has the Doctor's personal timeline now been completely re-written, overwriting everything we've ever seen? Lame.

    Some of Clara's lines felt shoe-horned in, as well – the soufflé business worked, but 'run, you clever boy, and remember' didn't. It was a line that flowed naturally for Oswin, way back, but not for Clara in this situation – and as Clara is the original, the reverse should be true. And at least some of what we saw on screen here flat out contradicted things that we've previously seen or been told. Sentiment and sweeping emotional speeches are all well and good, but I need narrative logic, and this era of the show doesn't have it.

    The Doctor being able to see and physically interact with the digital ghost River was the point at which the episode really lost me, however – I was buying it all up till then, and really enjoying it, but that was just a step too far. I've never been on board with the Doctor/River relationship to begin with.

    I enjoy the Paternoster Gang, but to me they feel more like caricatures than real people inhabiting a real world, and that's a weakness.

    It really bugs me that so many companions these days are being reduced to a mere strapline. The Impossible Girl. The Girl Who Waited. The Last Centurian. And so on. It sounds cool and makes for a handy soundbyte, sure, but those are titles for cartoon figures, not characters. I need my Doctor Who companions to feel like real people.

    Oh, I'm sure there's a lot more I could say – a lot of thoughts I had, both good and bad, that escape me for the moment. But I've rambled on long enough!

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  11. #327
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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/doctorwho...ave-Doctor-Who

    Matt Smith is leaving Who in the Christmas special, when the Doctor will regenerate.

    YES! Although the problem has never been Matt for me, but Moffat, and sadly Moffat is staying... so HALF YES, I guess.

    Jenna Louise Coleman is staying as well.

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    and her haircut. Nina's Avatar
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    I'm glad he is leaving because I still love 11 and I'm afraid I'll get really tired of him if he stays another season, like I did of 10 who I despised at the end of his run. But I think I'll miss him, he is by far my favorite Doctor because at times I truly believed him as an ancient alien. That's why I watch DW, to see that ancient alien. And I'm glad that Moffat (despite his faults, although I'm probably the only fan who likes his run as a showrunner. I'm glad he stays.) and Matt Smith created that character, I grew to be really fond of him.

    Hopefully they will go for an actor who isn't young and white, but I don't think that the BBC will let them cast somebody who isn't marketable. Unless a really big name wants to take over, it will probably be another white actor between the age of 20 and 50. But perhaps they suprise me.

  13. #329
    Agent 1.3 Llywela's Avatar
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    I'd have loved to see Smith's Doctor under a different showrunner, to see what he might have been with a more character-centric narrative style, but I suppose it wasn't to be. I think he's been excellent, but the broad brushstrokes writing style has really held him back, in many ways - he's always given his all to the role, though, and brought emotional credibility to scenarios that were all in the telling, without much build-up, and always lacked follow-through, so kudos to him for that.

    I really want to see an older Doctor again now, a return to the grandfatherly/mentorish elements of the character, rather than another young one who automatically has his companion's friends and family assuming he's her boyfriend.

    But then, I've always wanted a return to a more diverse type of companion, for that matter - NuWho has become fixated on the idea that only a very specific type of person would ever choose to go travelling with the Doctor, and so they all tend to be cut from much the same cloth. But that was the beauty of the show in the classic era, that the people who ended up travelling with him didn't all choose to do so and weren't all very much the same type of person, and that generated far more interesting and varied character dynamics than we tend to get today.

    Ian and Barbara, for example, were the first heroes of the show, they were the ones who taught the Doctor all the principles of compassion and heroism that he's been living by ever since, but they were with him because he kidnapped them, not because they wanted to travel the universe, and their desire to return home was their primary driving force throughout their time on the show. Harry Sullivan only set foot inside the Tardis because the Doctor played a trick on him, intending it to be one trip only, but then he got caught up in a prolonged sequence of events so that it was over a season before they finally made it back to Earth, and Harry's fish-out-of-water persona through those adventures as he adjusted to his culture shock brought a lot of humour and charm to those stories. Tegan Jovanka wandered into the Tardis by accident and then got caught up in a loose arc of stories that saw her thrown from pillar to post through several adventures before the Doctor was in a position where he could even attempt to take her home again - and then his erratic piloting style saw him struggle to land in the right place over and over, so that Tegan's desire to get back to her real life and frustration with the Doctor's failure to take her there was her driving force through those stories, generating friction in her relationship with the Doctor. And so on - I could give more examples. The character types and dynamics were so much more varied than we get today, with all these companions who are thirsting for adventure, just waiting for someone like the Doctor to come along and show them the universe and invariably adoring him for it. And I'd love to see a return to the more varied, classic kind of dynamic, told in the modern style.

    Alas, those days appear to be well and truly over, certainly while Moffat is at the helm, since he freely admits that he has no interest in exploring the companion's emotional journey and growth over their time with the Doctor, he just wants to tell 'cool' stories, whether they make sense or not.

    Paterson Joseph would make an awesome Doctor.

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    So there has been some chat in the VIP section about the casting of Peter Capaldi and John Hurt's potential role, so I thought it would be good to bring it out into the open forum. There's been no comments about Peter being cast so it seems a good time. I've summarised the comments below...

    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    As much as I love Matt Smith as The Doctor, I am so entirely excited about Peter Capaldi. I celebrated his announcement by re-watching The Thick of It, although I don't expect him to be acting like that much in Doctor Who :rofl:
    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    And yay for someone who understands that it was Peter Capaldi they cast and not Malcolm Tucker! :whistling: I was bored of the 'Malcolm Tucker as the Doctor' jokes by the end of the first day! I am, though, hoping that his personality will be diametrically opposed to Eleven's - I'd like to see a very contained, sarcastic, thoughtful (but still eccentric) Doctor as a contrast to Smith's overly wacky, zany, childish persona. Not to mention that we've had two very over-caffeinated Doctors in a row now and between them that's been a long, long time in the show's run, so there are now all these new young fans who need to see how very different the character can be - and that it's okay for him to be very different from one persona to the next, because he is also always the same man.
    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    I totally agree with the contrast to the excited puppy that is Matt, but I do love the "alien-ness" of 11th Doctor, 10 was too human to me. Although before Matt I would've said that I liked the human-ness!! !
    Quote Originally Posted by tangent View Post
    All about Twelve though and I agree with Jo completely. Older, more restrained, perhaps a little caustic would work nicely for me.

    Saying that...
    Spoiler:
    Is it Twelve or maybe Thirteen? Now that could be interesting.
    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Spoiler:
    I'm so conflicted

    I am very very excited about there being a Doctor that we don't know about, especially if it turns out to be something to do with the time war, but retroactive fitting the canon is lame.

    I've heard said that he could be The Valyard, but that's something to do with Classic Who I don't know about
    Quote Originally Posted by tangent View Post
    The Valeyard... Going to spoiler this in case anyone is or is going to watch the classic series.

    Spoiler:
    He first turns up in 'Trial of a Timelord' a multi story arc season featuring Six (really good by the way) as a kind of judge but turns out to be a distillation of the Doctors dark side and after his remaining regenerations.


    could be very interesting especially if they want to write in the regeneration limit and base a story/arc on it.
    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Spoiler:
    Could we say that The Valeyard is a bit like the Dream Lord? In that it was all the bad things of the Doctor?


    I really don't think there will be a regeneration limit included in this incarnation of Doctor Who, what with it being the BBC's most successful export and all that
    Quote Originally Posted by tangent View Post
    Well they won't kill it, no. The choice will be whether to ignore the limit completely or to write it in as a plot, acknowledge it and write around and past it. I quite like the idea of the latter.
    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    I expect it to be ignored completely. The target audience is people who haven't watched the classic series (i.e. children and teenagers) and won't know about it, so why bother unless there's a good story to tell. I agree though it would be interesting concept to introduce
    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    I dunno - I think a lot depends on who is at the helm at the time, because the regeneration limit has the potential to be a really good story. It doesn't matter if huge swathes of the current audience hasn't seen the classic show and doesn't know there was a regeneration limit - the new audience also knew nothing of the Daleks, the Master, etc, until they were reintroduced. (Speaking of which, the Valeyard was name-checked last season, which was interesting.) I mean, obviously the regeneration limit isn't going to mean the end of the show, there'll be a way around it, but I just think that the idea that the Doctor is fast coming up on what should be his last regeneration could be a really good, meaty, emotional storyline, of the kind that are so popular these days - and in many ways it would be crazy to ignore a good, meaty, emotional story that's right there, set up by the show's history. Why shoehorn an artificially generated character-plot (as was done with Amy, River, Clara) into a season when there's a strong and naturally developed character story right there in the material waiting to be told, a shoe that's been waiting 40 years to drop? The limit was mentioned more than once in the classic show, and now that we've reached that stage of the Doctor's life, it would be a shame not to pay that off. I can think of lots of different ways it could play out, just off the top of my head - many of 'em depending on what they do with the John Hurt character and how he fits into the grand scheme of things (I'm very wary, although cautiously optimistic because John Hurt).

    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    That makes good sense and I agree with you for the most part except Doctor Who is a show aimed more at children and teenagers (even though I think the BBC should reconsider that a bit) and therefore meaty, emotional stories don't seem to be high on the agenda. I would totally love to see a dark side, adult themed story but I don't think we're going to get it.

    Maybe they should do what they did with Hollyoaks with their collection of late night stories that were offshoots to the main storylines in the daytime show and had darker themes. Never watched them (or Hollyoaks for that matter) so not sure if they fit in with the main show or not, but I like the idea for DW
    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    Hmm. I'd say that meaty, emotional stories definitely have been on the Doctor Who agenda since it came back! Just looks at the way Rose and Donna's departures from the show played out as tragedy, or the way that the build-up to the Tenth Doctor's regeneration played out as (overblown) melodrama - and while Moffat skims the surface of the emotion more than RTD did, he's got the meaty, emotional subject matter right there (Rory's deaths, the abduction of baby Melody, etc). I don't see why the Doctor believing he has run out of regenerations and then a solution being found should play out any differently, it isn't inherently a more 'adult' subject than any other death/regeneration on the show. Being family-friendly doesn't mean that the show has ever really shied away from the subject of death. It doesn't need to be dark or adult-themed to be emotional - kids have always understood how regeneration works, this wouldn't really be any different! It's all in the writing, and like I said, I can see loads of possible ways to play it.

    That doesn't mean they'll actually go there, of course!
    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Yeah I guess you're right there, but as you say Moffat skims over the surface of them rather than get to the nitty gritty, which how I see him dealing with the issues and making them suitable for kids. I just wish there was a story that didn't have to take into consideration the younger viewers. I'm not sure that Moffat is the right person for that, but I do think that Peter Capaldi is the right Doctor!
    Personally, I love the cyclical nature of casting someone who is the same age as William Hartnell was when The Doctor was first created. Also, I am so tired of the companions seeing The Doctor as a potential love interest because apart from Donna all of the girls have been seen to fancy him. (I'm fairly certain that Clara does too even though it's not actually been said) I really don't see that continuing with an older Doctor.

    From what I've seen of the 1st Doctor (which is not a huge amount) he was pretty much a grumpy old man and very questionable in his decisions (kidnapping someone on the very first episode for example) I'd like to see some of that come back and open up audiences to the idea that he is not just an adventurer who runs about waving the sonic at everything.

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

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    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Personally, I love the cyclical nature of casting someone who is the same age as William Hartnell was when The Doctor was first created. Also, I am so tired of the companions seeing The Doctor as a potential love interest because apart from Donna all of the girls have been seen to fancy him. (I'm fairly certain that Clara does too even though it's not actually been said) I really don't see that continuing with an older Doctor.
    Have you seen the online prequel to the S7 finale? It was made pretty explicit there that Clara does fancy the Doctor and has to keep reminding herself not to fall in love with him. And even though Donna didn't fancy him, the show felt the need to remind us of that fact over and over again. I am very tired of every Doctor-companion relationship being defined in terms of whether or not it's a romance, whether or not they fancy one another. Just let the relationship be what it is without trying to define it all the time - like how it used to be!

    From what I've seen of the 1st Doctor (which is not a huge amount) he was pretty much a grumpy old man and very questionable in his decisions (kidnapping someone on the very first episode for example) I'd like to see some of that come back and open up audiences to the idea that he is not just an adventurer who runs about waving the sonic at everything.
    I adore the First Doctor. He has the most character development of any Doctor ever, and I love how that development plays out through the eyes of the companions, Ian and Barbara. In the first few adventures they don't know or trust him, so his prickly, antagonistic nature is pretty much all they see, and therefore all we see. They are the heroes of the story and the Doctor is the catalyst for their adventures, as much an antagonist as a protagonist. Although the Doctor's body is old, this is the youngest, most inexperienced version of him we've ever known - he's very isolated and reclusive, on the run from his own people, and fiercely protective of his granddaughter. He loves travel and he loves exploring new worlds and new cultures, learning all about them from a scientific standpoint...but he approaches his travels from a Time Lord perspective, their policy of non-intervention so deeply ingrained in him that it doesn't occur to him to behave otherwise. He does abduct Ian and Barbara in the first episode, and comes across as very malicious in doing so - because we're seeing it from their point of view and he's frightening them, they don't understand what they've stumbled into. From his point of view, he's just panicking. These ignorant, primitive humans have followed Susan home and that frightens him, he sees them as a threat. So he takes off with them aboard in a fit of pique, basically, to stop them telling anyone what they saw aboard his ship...

    Only then he finds himself stuck with them, because he didn't think it through. And then trouble happens, as it is wont to do when the Doctor is around, and they are forced to rely on one another - and he begins to realise that these ignorant, primitive humans aren't so valueless after all. More than that, to his amazement, there's a lot he can learn from them. It is from Ian and Barbara that he learns all the principles of compassion and heroism that he's been living by ever since, basically - they really are the most important companions he's ever had, and that development all plays out on screen, through the first three or four serials in particular (about 20 episodes of highly serialised storytelling, each adventure running into the next). One of the things I love about the fourth serial Marco Polo is that the perspective has shifted enough that we are now seeing the Doctor from the other side - he reacts to Marco Polo in much the same way that he did Ian and Barbara; the man's actions are a threat to him (Marco has confiscated the TARDIS), and he is frightened and angry and so lashes out verbally, enormously frustrated by his enforced dependence and helplessness...but this time we are bang on his side, because Ian and Barbara are on his side now and understand him so much better, they know where his temper is coming from and agree with it, in emotion if not in action (he's all bluster, basically). They're all in it together by then, a team. The Doctor learns to respect and love his human companions enough that he will risk his life for them - and they for him - and that mutual love and respect continues to grow and grow. He is absolutely devastated when they choose to take the first opportunity they've had to return home, but by then he no longer needs an Ian or a Barbara on board to act as the moral centre of the show, because the Doctor has become that moral centre himself - it's wonderful character development, playing out over the first two seasons of the show.

    So...yes, the First Doctor is a crochety old man. He's arrogant and high-minded and prideful - but the same can be said of every incarnation he's ever had, really, they all have their moments. And that isn't all there is to him. He is also playful, mischievous, generous, loyal, loving and funny. He loves exploring and he loves to learn, he takes great joy in scientific discovery. He is willing to learn from his mistakes. He has the most adorable relationships with his companions. It's a shame he's so misunderstood, largely because so few people are willing to sit down and watch black-and-white serials made in 1963. They are a big adjustment, sure, and you have to be willing to watch them for what they are rather than expecting them to conform to modern standards - plus this era more than most benefits from being watched in order, to follow the ongoing story as it develops. Watched for the characters and their experiences and relationships, the First Doctor era is absolutely delightful and I love everyone in it! Every facet of the Doctor's personality, in all its many varied forms through each regeneration, can be traced back to the seeds sown by William Hartnell's performance as the First Doctor.

    Oh, that was a bit of a rant! :whistling: What I meant to say was that I agree, I'd love to get back to a Doctor who was alien and enigmatic and travelled for the love of exploration and science and was sometimes hard to understand, rather than being a thrill-seeker who solves all his problems by waving a sonic screwdriver at them and makes lascivious comments about his companion's short skirts!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    Have you seen the online prequel to the S7 finale? It was made pretty explicit there that Clara does fancy the Doctor and has to keep reminding herself not to fall in love with him. And even though Donna didn't fancy him, the show felt the need to remind us of that fact over and over again. I am very tired of every Doctor-companion relationship being defined in terms of whether or not it's a romance, whether or not they fancy one another. Just let the relationship be what it is without trying to define it all the time - like how it used to be!
    Not seen that. Is it still available do you know?

    So...yes, the First Doctor is a crochety old man. He's arrogant and high-minded and prideful - but the same can be said of every incarnation he's ever had, really, they all have their moments. And that isn't all there is to him. He is also playful, mischievous, generous, loyal, loving and funny. He loves exploring and he loves to learn, he takes great joy in scientific discovery. He is willing to learn from his mistakes. He has the most adorable relationships with his companions.
    From what I have watched I would agree with you that he is so much more than a grumpy old b**ger, and that he changes into a really interesting character quite quickly.

    It's a shame he's so misunderstood, largely because so few people are willing to sit down and watch black-and-white serials made in 1963. They are a big adjustment, sure, and you have to be willing to watch them for what they are rather than expecting them to conform to modern standards
    I so want to watch them all from start to finish. I started a few months ago but I really struggled with it and got as far as the serial that Susan leaves. I think there's a lot more effort required now to watch them than there would've been in 1963, because we've come to expect certain standards that were just not possible then. For that reason it feels like a chore to watch it, even though I enjoy them on hindsight. But the main problem I find is that there's so, so much of it. I mean Duh! 50 years obviously but the first season has something like 70 or 80 transmitted 30 min episodes, so that's like 3 or 4 seasons of a modern TV season.

    What I would really love is for all the episodes to be transcribed into a novel format, with all the words and actions of the characters, and descriptions of the sets so we could make our own universe. I read a transcript of the first episode of The Daleks serial, and thought that the idea of Barbara running up and down corridors with the doors closing and stopping her escaping whilst she gets more and more panicked very terrifying. The visual on the show doesn't live up to that terror IMO.


    Watched for the characters and their experiences and relationships, the First Doctor era is absolutely delightful and I love everyone in it! Every facet of the Doctor's personality, in all its many varied forms through each regeneration, can be traced back to the seeds sown by William Hartnell's performance as the First Doctor.
    I don't think there is anyone not to love up to where I got to. (I know there is changes to the cast from that point on) Barbara and Ian are wonderful and I loved the very very subtle play on their relationship. Arguably, Susan is the most annoying and seems very childish for her age, but again that's with modern eyes. I wasn't even born then how would I know how a 15 yr old would act in 1963, she may have got it right on the button!


    I agree, I'd love to get back to a Doctor who was alien and enigmatic and travelled for the love of exploration and science and was sometimes hard to understand, rather than being a thrill-seeker who solves all his problems by waving a sonic screwdriver at them and makes lascivious comments about his companion's short skirts!
    I agree it would be very refreshing to see a change in pace with the 12th, but I worry that modern audiences expect more spectacle and thrill, and by extension a mystery to solve and a world to save in every episode so the BBC would shy away from a less "energetic" story-telling

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

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    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Not seen that. Is it still available do you know?
    He Said, She Said

    From what I have watched I would agree with you that he is so much more than a grumpy old b**ger, and that he changes into a really interesting character quite quickly.
    Grumpy old sod is just where he starts out from - the beginning of his journey.

    I so want to watch them all from start to finish. I started a few months ago but I really struggled with it and got as far as the serial that Susan leaves. I think there's a lot more effort required now to watch them than there would've been in 1963, because we've come to expect certain standards that were just not possible then. For that reason it feels like a chore to watch it, even though I enjoy them on hindsight. But the main problem I find is that there's so, so much of it. I mean Duh! 50 years obviously but the first season has something like 70 or 80 transmitted 30 min episodes, so that's like 3 or 4 seasons of a modern TV season.
    Slow and steady really does win the race, where classic Who is concerned. I really struggled with the First Doctor era when I first started watching it, so I mixed and matched with other eras, a bit here and a bit there. Then when I went back and rewatched that first season in order, something just clicked into place and that was it. I think we are so used, in general, to all shows adhering to much the same style, structure and format, with modern production values, that we train our brains to expect nothing else - so it can take some effort to unlearn that training and be able to appreciate vintage television for its own sake and for what it achieved with the budget and technology available instead of dismissing it for what it isn't, so to speak. It's worth the effort, though, because if we adjust our expectations to meet the show on its own terms and watch it in the spirit with which it was made, if we can take our foot off the gas long enough to appreciate a simpler story told at a slower pace, the experience can be tremendously rewarding - and it's a shame to miss out on great characters and great stories just because we demand all our shows look the same. The main trick with Doctor Who is not to try to marathon an entire serial in one sitting, as if it were the equivalent of a single modern episode, because they really aren't. Those 25-minute episodes are much better digested one at a time, as originally intended (at least until you are really in the swing of them) - I've written reams on the subject here.

    I'm still a long way from having seen every episode ever made, but I've worked my way through a heck of a lot of them now. The trick is to pace yourself - I think in this fast-paced internet age we tend to want to do everything at speed, to marathon a new show as quickly as possible and then move onto the next, as if it were a race, but classic Who is best savoured slowly. There's no rush, after all. And the more familiar with it you become, the more you can go back to serials you struggled with first time around and find you appreciate them so much more second time around because you're into the swing of the era now.

    What I would really love is for all the episodes to be transcribed into a novel format, with all the words and actions of the characters, and descriptions of the sets so we could make our own universe. I read a transcript of the first episode of The Daleks serial, and thought that the idea of Barbara running up and down corridors with the doors closing and stopping her escaping whilst she gets more and more panicked very terrifying. The visual on the show doesn't live up to that terror IMO.
    Well, every classic serial ever made was published as a novelisation, you know. They're very basic, as novels go, because they were aimed at a young audience and had a very strict page count, which limited the ability of the writers to really delve into the stories - plus, again, they are very much the style of the time. But I grew up on those books and think they're great! I would always recommend purchasing where possible, of course but since most of 'em are out of print, they can all be downloaded in PDF/ebook format - links here.

    I don't think there is anyone not to love up to where I got to. (I know there is changes to the cast from that point on) Barbara and Ian are wonderful and I loved the very very subtle play on their relationship. Arguably, Susan is the most annoying and seems very childish for her age, but again that's with modern eyes. I wasn't even born then how would I know how a 15 yr old would act in 1963, she may have got it right on the button!
    Carole Ann Foreman left the show because she was frustrated with the way Susan was written - she was promised more of an active, ass-kicking, enigmatic alien character, so was very disappointed at how naive and clingy Susan turned out to be. She can be very feeble, but I can see why they went down that road - in the beginning, Susan was the only thing the Doctor and his two very reluctant human companions had in common; her need and vulnerability brought them together, gave them common ground. So her broken reed personality served a valuable narrative function. It's just a shame that when that function was no longer needed, her personality was already established. I find Susan much easier to appreciate if instead of being frustrated with how needy and panicky the character is, I instead wonder what the hell happened to give her that enormous abandonment complex. And when you look past her fear and panic, like with her grandfather, there's a lot more to her. She's creative and playful, loves beauty, loves learning, and is full of energy and optimism (even if she does give into despair rather too easily).

    Heh, I'm very glass-half-full where this era is concerned!

    Oh, and if you stopped at Dalek Invasion of Earth, you haven't met Vicki yet! Vicki is brilliant - if Ian and Barbara taught the Doctor heroism and compassion, it was Vicki who taught him to have fun with his adventures.

    I agree it would be very refreshing to see a change in pace with the 12th, but I worry that modern audiences expect more spectacle and thrill, and by extension a mystery to solve and a world to save in every episode so the BBC would shy away from a less "energetic" story-telling
    It is very easy, in this day and age, for shows to get into a rut. "But the audience expects!" they cry, and so refuse to change a formula that long ago grew stale, preferring instead to carry on flogging that dead horse until it falls apart. Doctor Who, though, has for the last 50 years been a show that thrives on change, and I hate the idea that it could get locked into a style-over-substance, all-action-all-the-time, frenetic thrill-ride structure just because the last few years have taught the audience to expect as much. A change of pace is needed to show the audience what else the show can be. I am confident that however much loved Matt Smith's wacky, zany, childish Doctor persona might be, the Twelfth Doctor coming in with a completely different persona would quickly be just as well loved, if not more so. Audiences are more adaptible than they are sometimes given credit for, especially if change is built into the structure of the show. Doctors Nine and Ten were written with modern audiences in mind, had their share of spectacle and thrill, had a mystery to solve and a world to save in every episode, but their stories weren't told so fast that there was no room for character focus. The Matt Smith era has been incredibly fast-paced and that's what the current audience has grown accustomed to, but it is only one era out of a 50-year-old show. Taking the foot off the gas again isn't going to hurt the show - can only benefit it, in fact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Llywela View Post
    Well, every classic serial ever made was published as a novelisation, you know. They're very basic, as novels go, because they were aimed at a young audience and had a very strict page count, which limited the ability of the writers to really delve into the stories - plus, again, they are very much the style of the time. But I grew up on those books and think they're great! I would always recommend purchasing where possible, of course but they can all be downloaded in PDF format here.
    Thank you soooo much for this, I'm going to try one and see if I enjoy them. I did think that novelisations should have happened, but just didn't think to look for them to see if they did (if that makes sense).

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

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    Quote Originally Posted by ciderdrinker View Post
    Thank you soooo much for this, I'm going to try one and see if I enjoy them. I did think that novelisations should have happened, but just didn't think to look for them to see if they did (if that makes sense).
    The novelisations were the only way for fans to relive episodes past, before the advent of home VHS! For me they were my earliest exposure to the first few Doctors - there's still a whole slew of stories I know from the novelisation rather than the telly episodes.

    They're a bit of a mixed bag, really, depending on who wrote them and how much access they had to the source material. Some stick strictly to the original story, others expand on the source material or even change it (the novelisation for The Daleks, for instance, was the first written, and because it was standalone at the time it changed Ian and Barbara's whole origin story!) A huge number were churned out by Terrance Dicks, based mostly on shooting scripts and whatever he could remember of those serials as they aired; he's a decent writer and did a decent job. Some were written by the original scriptwriter, allowing him to develop the concept behind his story in a way that production values/ideals at the time didn't allow - I'm always amused by David Whitaker's novelisation of his script for The Crusades, because he's such a shipper and writes Ian and Barbara's relationship very overtly as a romance (this and other novelisations are the reason I always took it completely for granted that Ian and Barbara were a couple, and was surprised when I first watched their telly episodes to realise that they were never explicitly shown to be a couple on the show!). Ian Marter, who played the Fourth Doctor's companion Harry Sullivan, wrote about 9 novelisations - some were serials he'd appeared in himself, so had an inside perspective of, Earthshock he wrote just after it aired so he'd have seen it, others he'd only have had the shooting script for. Apparently a fan lent him a videotape of extant episodes of The Invasion when he was writing the novelisation for that - he had a viewing party with Nicholas Courtney (the Brigadier), as they were great friends and Courtney had never actually seen the serial despite starring in it! There was an unnamed Russian airbase referred to in the serial - for the novelisation, Marter called it Nikortny as a tribute to Courtney!

    Oh, and Gary Russell (once a child actor who played Dick in The Famous Five) wrote the novelisation for the 8th Doctor's TV Movie before it had been released, and only had the shooting script to work from - he asked for more details from the set, etc, to help, but they were so paranoid about spoilers he wasn't allowed! He did a great job, considering!

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    There are some new interviews out with Steven Moffat, teasing his plans for the Twelfth Doctor - here and here.

    "The Doctor's always said he’s thousands of years old, and suddenly he’s going to look closer to what we know he secretly is," says Steven Moffat, in an exclusive sneak-peek quote given to doctorwho.tv. "He’s going to look like an older man. A fiercer man. He won’t be the dashing young man he was a minute ago, and I think that’ll be rather exciting…"
    • Moffat is pretty certain Capaldi will keep his native Scottish accent for the role
    • At the moment, they’ve only discussed Twelve’s costume in the lightest terms
    • Moffat wanted to flip the switch the other way after having two youthful and accessible Doctors in a row
    • He’s going to be an older, trickier and fiercer Doctor
    • “Just as Clara’s learning to have a proper old crush on him, suddenly he’s Malcolm Tucker!”
    • Moffat thinks it’ll be fun seeing Clara cope with the Doctor being completely different…
    • …”I think the fun story will be – and we have the opportunity here – is this is what regeneration can do to you. He can be very, very different.” “People really love Jenna, so we make the Doctor quite difficult…”
    • …Moffat likens the situation to Tom Baker’s first season: “He’s really quite difficult to take at the beginning, and you’re very grateful that Sarah and the Brigadier are there to reassure you.”
    Hmm. I didn't think Tom Baker's Doctor was difficult to take to at all - he's wildly eccentric, but very charming from the start, and I've always had the impression that most fans fell under his spell pretty much immediately (although wasn't born myself, so can't possibly know for sure!) Not keen on the 'suddenly he's Malcolm Tucker' quote because he shouldn't be - he can have a similarly ascerbic personality, but he isn't going to be the same character by any means. As far as Clara coping with the Doctor being completely different goes...won't she have memories of all his regenerations ever by then, after being retrieved from within his timestream? Or are we to assume that the anniversary special will take all those memories away from her again? Or is it as simple as those memories of all the splinter Claras and the various Doctors they encountered not being remotely the same thing as experiencing the regeneration of her friend first hand? Also, I'm not so sure about everyone loving Clara enough for her to be the one who grounds the show through a difficult transition to a new Doctor. ;confused:

    I do, though, love what he says about the new Doctor being trickier and fiercer, and flipping the switch the other way and really showing what regeneration can do, how very different the new Doctor can be - that's pretty much what I've been saying. I just hope he follows through on it.

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    Following on from our John Hurt talk earlier in the thread

    Spoiler:
    It seems there is more likelihood that he's the Doctor between Paul McGann and Chrsitopher Eccleston....

    http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/08/...e-hurt-insert/
    Last edited by ciderdrinker; 22-08-13 at 07:04 PM.

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

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    Oh my giddy aunt! Can it really be true?

    A number of early episodes of Doctor Who, which were believed to have been permanently lost, have been returned to the BBC

    This has been rumoured for months, the speculation running rampant at times, but I've not really let myself get too hopeful because it seemed too good to be true. Of course, it remains to be seen just what has been found and what condition it's in, but that something has been found is official now! I can't wait to find out what it is! :bug_eyes:;party_popper: Dare I hope for Marco Polo? Or Power of the Daleks? Web of Fear? I want them all!

    I know this won't mean much to just about anyone else here, but for me this is the most exciting news all year!

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    I've managed to get tickets for the 3D showing of the 50th anniversary episode Day of the Doctor at a cinema in London. The tickets weren't supposed to be on sale until 9am but they went on sale at 8am and by 8.15 had sold out!

    I'm really excited now!

    Peter Capaldi is the 12th Doctor

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    Agent 1.3 Llywela's Avatar
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    On the heels of the official trailer comes an online minisode prequel to set the scene and it's
    Spoiler:
    Paul McGann! Guys! It's the 8th Doctor, on-screen again, referencing his extended universe companions, and he's battle-weary and regenerating, and this is where John Hurt comes from, and it might just explain the numbering issue, and EEEEEEEEE! Released on his 54th birthday, as well - and I want to know where that man found the fountain of youth because he really doesn't look any older than he did in 1996!

    Not just fannish lip service bringing McGann back and filling in a regenerative gap, either: the darling 8th Doctor gets to be funny, dashing, tragic, everything. It's a proper bit of drama, all in just 6 minutes, and the acknowledgement of his Big Finish companions underscores the fact that he's had more than two big adventures - Paul McGann is, after all, the longest serving Doctor when his audio adventures are taken into account. This tiny episode blends his extended universe adventures into the main canon of the show beautifully.

    And it's a clever script. It's sort of deconstructive - it starts off like an RTD story, with the Doctor rescuing a beautiful young woman who wants to see the universe...and then she rejects him because of the Time War. (God, the *pain* in the Doctor's face when Cass says "Don't touch me") and the dying Doctor comes to see that being the Doctor, that 'Doctor Who' doesn't work in the Time War context. So he resolves to change to change the universe, to save everyone because he couldn't save Cass. It's condensed but I think it does the job beautifully. The Doctor gets to be heroic. He gets to be self-sacrificing. We get to see that he didn't want to be part of the War ("I help where I can but I will not fight"), how he became part of it and why he felt he had no choice. McGann is just brilliant. His bit about "Four minutes? That's ages!" is just so him. And what great last words. Immense. Plus, they did a good job of having their cake and eating it too: Hurt's Warrior Doctor will be the one who ends the war, but McGann's Doctor lived through it... they're both the Time War Doctor. Could not be happier right now.

    Plus - Sisterhood of Karn! That's a Brain of Morbius reference! 40-year continuity for the win!

    Oh, but how I wish there could be a McGann series now - Doctor Who: The Missing Years! I mean, I always wished for a McGann series because I loved him in the Movie and have heard enough of his audios to know how good he is, plus so pretty! But I want it more than ever now...never gonna be, of course, so having this little minisode is just fab.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/i/p01lhhv4/

    I'm getting very excited now.

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