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Thread: What are your favorite band(s)/singer(s)

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    Hellmouth Tourist bangel is love's Avatar
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    Default What are your favorite band(s)/singer(s)

    Mine are Heart, Avril Lavigne, and Evanescence. How about you?
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    Right now, it has to be the Beatles for me So much so that I'm hunting down all their albums, and I have it in my head what I'm going to get and all..

    Other than that, Panic! at the Disco, Fall Out Boy, My Chemical Romance, Elvis, Adam Lambert, Daughtry, Jason Mraz, and so many others. I've got a bit of everything on my iPod
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    Mine is Avril Lavigne, love her so much!
    I am going to do my top 5 favorite singers/bands!

    1) Avril Lavigne
    2) Leona Lewis
    3) Evanescences
    4) One Republic
    5) Linkin Park

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    You have spectacular taste.
    Quote Originally Posted by buffylover View Post
    Mine is Avril Lavigne, love her so much!
    I am going to do my top 5 favorite singers/bands!

    1) Avril Lavigne
    2) Leona Lewis
    3) Evanescences
    4) One Republic
    5) Linkin Park
    "Stay with me." "Forever. That's the whole point. I'll never leave. Not even if you kill me."

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    I have many- Sting, George Michael, Kylie Minogue and i just Adam Lambert. Seriously i'm in luv. He's so handsome and has a great voice. Here's a pic, if you haven't heard about him.


    And one of my favorite songs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6LKX...eature=related

    i love ABBA and i adore Modern Talking as well.
    Last edited by plamivasi; 19-06-10 at 12:24 PM.
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    The Dark Avenger NileQT87's Avatar
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    (Well, not so much all bands/singers, but music in general.)

    1. Elvis Presley
    2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    3. Jerry Lee Lewis
    4. Judy Garland
    5. Desi Arnaz
    6. The Righteous Brothers
    7. The Platters
    8. Ricky Nelson
    9. Dion & the Belmonts
    10. Julie Andrews
    11. Danny Elfman
    12. John Williams
    13. Sonny & Cher
    14. The Blues Brothers
    15. The Beach Boys
    16. Ludwig van Beethoven
    17. Del Shannon
    18. Ritchie Valens
    19. Brenda Lee
    20. Buddy Holly
    21. David Cassidy
    22. Fats Domino
    23. Jackie Wilson
    24. Roy Orbison
    25. Sam Cooke

    And for the record, I am 23, contrary to what my musical taste suggests. Yes, I realize that none of them are under 50 (most way over that) and half of them are dead. Beyond that, I like a lot of general '50s-'70s oldies and some classical/soundtrack. The links go to my favorite piece of each artist.
    Last edited by NileQT87; 03-07-10 at 10:59 PM.

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    favorite band in general has to be Coldplay I am a huge Coldplay fan. Apart from that:
    Amy Winehouse
    Travis
    Not a band but: the Amelie moviesoundtrack
    The Beatles
    Rolling Stones
    Aretha Franklin
    Ray Charles
    Nina Simone
    Duffy (kinda sorta)
    Damien Rice
    Russian band: DDT
    The Cardigans

    and a lot more but this is pritty much the core list

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    I,m more into the oldies these days so i listen a lot to :
    Van Morrison
    Dee Edwards
    Etta James
    Doris Day
    and of course i listen a lot to new music like :
    Florence & The Machine
    Thom Yorke
    Kings Of Leon
    Jazmine Sullivan (please try to look for her songs she's amazing)
    Sia
    Vampire Weekend
    Grizzly Bear
    Coldplay
    Bat For Lashes
    Lady Gaga

    Well i guess that's all for now =)
    You Are The Only One
    Who Ever Touched My Heart
    It Will Always Be Yours.

    To The Icon Maker,Thanks

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    It's so radical to see so many different musical tastes here. Buffy brings so many diverse people together, I love it.

    I forgot Vanilla Ninja. They're not really popular than in a few countries in Europe so most of you have probably never heard of them. If you like girls that rock check them out.
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    I guess I should post a list too

    The Beatles,
    Adam Lambert,
    Daughtry
    Fall Out Boy
    My Chemical Romance
    Panic! at the Disco
    Green Day
    blink-182
    Florence and the Machine
    Jason Mraz
    Elvis
    Bowling for Soup
    Paramore
    Evanescence


    I hate making lists like this: I can never remember the groups I like

    No Beatles, Nile? They fit right in to the 60's era
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    I don't really like the Beatles (or much at all of all that hippie stuff) and their early cover stuff was all done better by the Isley Brothers, etc... The Beatles were hardly the best singing-wise and Lennon's Marxist counterculture politics are irritating (Imagine, by his own admission, is practically the Communist Manifesto--seriously, look at the lyrics). I also find it hard to like Lennon due to incidents where he made remarks about not liking to look at the disabled people in the front row of the concerts.

    Though points to George Harrison after seeing Elvis at Madison Square Garden in '72 where he was meeting the Beatles' hero, Elvis, backstage wearing grungy, torn jeans and a long scraggly beard while Elvis was dressed to the nines and he was so embarrassed that he wrote a scathing piece about the counterculture because of it. Well, slightly better than his first meeting where he spent the entire time smoking pot next to the pool. Funny story--when the Beatles met Elvis, at first they just sat on his floor and were staring at him, so he made a comment that if they were just going to stare at him all night, he was going to bed (which broke the ice). Also that night, some of Elvis' fans had broken into his Palm Springs house (not that untypical--people made it over the Graceland wall all the time) and were hiding in his shower--so, Elvis, with the Beatles, found them hiding there. The Beatles thought Elvis was going to just kick them out, but were surprised that, while he did tell them nicely that it was wrong to break into his house, still was happy to do autographs for them. The Beatles had a lot of trouble dealing with fans and pretty much stopped live performances due to being unable to control or handle the noise (not to mention Lennon and his discomfort with disabled fans--Elvis always treated disabled fans extra special with special behind-the-stage meetings, did stuff for the March of Dimes and even performed for quadriplegics in his early touring days).

    Of course, there's the controversial letter that Elvis wrote to Nixon and stuff he said in that meeting that involved him talking about John Lennon, the Black Panthers, Jane Fonda, etc... being bad influences for America. Some say it was just out of jealousy or trying to placate Nixon (he also wrote a fan letter to J. Edgar Hoover, who declined to meet him), but I'm pretty sure he meant it. Nixon actually defended Elvis after he died, so he clearly had liked him during that famous meeting (the fancy pistol that Elvis gave Nixon in the Oval Office is in the Nixon Library). I'm sure Elvis didn't like the "bigger than Jesus" comment--this is the guy who rejected being called "the King" by fans because the only "King" is Jesus. Elvis made a point of being humble and kind to the fans (he talked with them at the gate and invited them to watch T.V., go the amusement park, roller rink, theater, etc... with him all the time--he even got mad at security when they would be keeping the fans from the stage and say they just wanted scarves--he always would say that they put the shirt on his back) and that comment is pretty much the opposite of his philosophy. And Sonny West has hinted that Elvis was not happy with the way the soldiers were being treated during Vietnam (he had been in the Army and refused special treatment). There's a reason Elvis sang An American Trilogy in front of 46 countries and 1.4 billion people. He was extremely pro-America/patriotic. Dean Martin actually wrote a letter to Elvis after toppling the Beatles with #1 record in 1965 and said that he "did it for us". It's funny, because Frank Sinatra had been among the worst anti-Elvis voices when he was controversial in the '50s out of jealousy, but by 1960, they had become buddies and let Elvis borrow his plane for his Vegas wedding, Nancy appeared in Speedway and Elvis went to her Vegas birthday, Sammy Davis, Jr. can actually be seen in the concert video That's the Way It Is, etc... Elvis basically put the Rat Pack out of business in the '50s, but they ended up becoming friends. The Beatles never quite became so friendly with Elvis despite the Palm Springs visit and George Harrison's MSG meeting.

    I like '50s-'70s, but the whole late-'60s counterculture stuff is a major turn-off. And the '50s artists basically got stuffed to the side during the mid-to-late '60s era and only were able to emerge again in the '70s (there was a whole bunch of them that made comebacks).

    Elvis and Lennon are both visible in this Palm Springs photo (Elvis is at the door):
    Last edited by NileQT87; 10-07-10 at 06:47 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NileQT87 View Post
    Though points to George Harrison after seeing Elvis at Madison Square Garden in '72 where he was meeting the Beatles' hero, Elvis, backstage wearing grungy, torn jeans and a long scraggly beard while Elvis was dressed to the nines and he was so embarrassed that he wrote a scathing piece about the counterculture because of it. Well, slightly better than his first meeting where he spent the entire time smoking pot next to the pool. Funny story--when the Beatles met Elvis, at first they just sat on his floor and were staring at him, so he made a comment that if they were just going to stare at him all night, he was going to bed (which broke the ice). Also that night, some of Elvis' fans had broken into his Palm Springs house (not that untypical--people made it over the Graceland wall all the time) and were hiding in his shower--so, Elvis, with the Beatles, found them hiding there. The Beatles thought Elvis was going to just kick them out, but were surprised that, while he did tell them nicely that it was wrong to break into his house, still was happy to do autographs for them. The Beatles had a lot of trouble dealing with fans and pretty much stopped live performances due to being unable to control or handle the noise
    Yeah I'd read one or two things about them being really ticked their music wasn't even audible over screaming fans... That would've been horrible really...

    (not to mention Lennon and his discomfort with disabled fans--Elvis always treated disabled fans extra special with special behind-the-stage meetings, did stuff for the March of Dimes and even performed for quadriplegics in his early touring days).
    That's pretty cool, Elvis doing so much work. And I doubt a lot of that was a publicity stint (which a lot would be considered as that nowadays. I mean, imagine Lady Gaga doing something like that. I genuinely can't. She seems really sucked up in her own fame...

    I'm sure Elvis didn't like the "bigger than Jesus" comment--this is the guy who rejected being called "the King" by fans because the only "King" is Jesus.
    I know the "bigger than Jesus" thing and heck, I imagine any Christian (of which there were a lot back then) would've been fuming, but apparently that was taken way out of context. John publicly apologised for that comment and no, I don't condone it, but I think I half understand what he meant.

    I like '50s-'70s, but the whole late-'60s counterculture stuff is a major turn-off. And the '50s artists basically got stuffed to the side during the mid-to-late '60s era and only were able to emerge again in the '70s (there was a whole bunch of them that made comebacks).
    So all the current stuff with all the old groups like Take That coming back is like a replay of that? That's pretty weird...

    I'm not a huge fan of all the "Indian music" thing George had going on after the sitar on the "Help!" set, but he did write some of my favourite songs (Here Comes the Sun, While my Guitar Gently weeps, Something, Taxman......). I love Ringo's "Octopus' Garden": It is meant for children but it's such a fun song! I love most of their other songs too (but I'm not going to mention them cause this post'll be masively massive otherwise ) That said, his changing style of songs really shows the different members wanting to take their own directions imo.

    I was at a Green Day concert recently. They sang the "na, na na" part in Hey Jude. The whole audience was singing along, and me in the very middle, crying my eyes out. It definitely made my life
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    Emilie Autumn, Rise Against, Nightwish, Regina Spektor, Counting Crows, Florence and the Machine, Matt Nathanson, Imogen Heap, Rasputina (Trannsylvanian Concumbine anyone?)

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    Rasputina (Transylvanian Concubine! <3)
    Lady Gaga
    Imogen Heap
    Emilie Autumn
    Regina Spektor
    Dropkick Murphys
    Rise Against
    Counting Crows
    Florence and the Machine
    Matt Nathanson
    ...and then I have lots of oneoff songs, like the bits and pieces of Natalie Merchant and Jason Mraz that I adore.

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    Lostprophets & Avenged Sevenfold XD

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    Yeah, it's funny how entertainment goes in cycles. Different eras of music end up going out of fashion, but you give it a while and suddenly they're as big as ever, sometimes actual comebacks where they are legitimately successful in a mainstream popular way or they end up joining the oldies circuit (which still is going very strong despite everybody on it being somewhere between their 60s and 80s--most of the '50s artists are in their 70s now--well, the ones that made it past overdoses and plane/car crashes of which there were many, notably "the Day the Music Died" with Buddy, Ritchie and the Big Bopper--and Elvis had the cards stacked against him with hereditary heart and colon problems--the latter being what caused the water-retentive bloating--on top of prescription drug abuse--medication for problems just caused more problems).

    I still get a thrill when I see, say, recent clips of Jerry Lee Lewis (same age as Elvis--Jerry Lee also made a comeback after his cousin marriage scandal in the '70s as a country artist)--he showed up for the Johnny Cash concert a few years ago, and, even though he's clearly getting very old, he still was the best and most touching moment of the whole thing (Jerry Lee is the only one left of the Sun Studios Million Dollar Quartet/Class of '55 bunch--Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash & Roy Orbison--still left--he even refers to this fact by calling himself "the last man standing"--it was great also when the latter four did a tribute show on Johnny Cash's show when Elvis died and then did a song dedicated to him recorded at Sun). It's a shame that Bobby Hatfield (Righteous Brothers) died of a cocaine overdose back in 2003, because that's one oldies act that I would have loved to have seen also (it must be so weird for Bill Medley, the baritone, to perform without Bobby, the tenor). I've noticed that the oldies circuit has really been making the rounds on Huckabee for the last few years (James Burton--Ricky Nelson and Elvis' guitarist--has been on three times, George Jones, Neil Sedaka, Dion "and the Belmonts" DiMucci, Andy Williams, etc... have all made appearances). I like to joke that Huckabee has become American Bandstand's retirement home.

    Spoiler:
    And speaking of artists that do charity: Elvis just did crazy amounts of it without any publicity at all (in fact, he preferred it if nobody found out). He'd give $1,000 to 50 local charities every Christmas and avoided publicity for it. That's just so much the antithesis of 90% of the artists who do it today who only will do it if they can get the media spotlight on them. Elvis paid for Jackie Wilson's hospital bills when he was in a coma at the end of his life, paid a lot of random people's hospital bills, had a random stranger tracked down in order to pay his house mortgage after he gave him a dime at a pay phone (Elvis never carried money), gave away tons of cars, his own wedding ring on the passenger plane on the way to his honeymoon, did March of Dimes, the Cynthia Milk Fund concert on July 4, 1956, Aloha was for the Kui Lee Cancer Fund (free concert admission with people giving donations), the free-with-a-donation 1961 concert was to pay for the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor--of which he gave the largest donation, etc... Another thing that really makes him different than most celebrities is, frankly, everyone knew where he lived and fans were welcome to visit with him at the gate (both Graceland and Palm Springs) or stand in his front yard (one of the Memphis Mafia members, Lamar Fike, was just a very overweight fan who had climbed the wall with a stack of records and Elvis thought it was hilarious that he had made it over the wall and made him part of his entourage). He'd do things like line all the girls up at the gate and kiss all of them. And he got absolutely pissed when security would try to keep fans away from the stage (going as far as to tell them that they weren't trying to hurt him and that they just wanted scarves). He actually did two walk-throughs (irritating security like crazy--they also stopped him from doing cartwheels on stage in 1969) through the audience at the International in Vegas in 1970, had lots and lots of fans actually make it onto the stage (he'd be doing a song and suddenly he'd be getting hugged--he'd even egg them on to see if they could get past security), fans got close enough to rip his pant legs right off him on stage in the '50s (and then he just shredded what was left of the pants and threw them out the window when he was changing!), fans chased him across a football field into the locker room where he was on top of a shower getting his clothes ripped off, etc... I mean, gate security at Graceland was Uncle Vester--and Vester would spend his time just telling stories about his nephew to the fans. Elvis was pretty frickin' approachable when it came to fans and some of them even became friends (Priscilla, herself, was just a fan). Gladys used to bake cookies for fans who would be standing around the yard waiting at the middle-class Audubon Drive house for Elvis to come home on his motorcycle in 1956 (the Presleys actually got chased away from the neighborhood because the neighbors were complaining about all the fans in the front yard). The Memphis Mafia guys that Elvis fired were fired because they were being too rough with the fans while doing security (it was these guys that started the vengeful tell-all books). I mean, Elvis couldn't go anywhere without attracting a crowd (though he did sign autographs while out and about Memphis on his motorcycle at places like gas stations), but his fan-approachability was unparalleled, IMO. Of course, you can't do what he did today. He was special deputy sheriff of Shelby County and he actually did stop people on the road with the siren on his car for speeding violations (he got a kick over seeing their faces)--and he was also hanging out with the police at the height of the counterculture who were big on calling the police "pigs" at the time. Famous people today all live in gated communities and are completely untouchable behind security and get followed by the paparazzi (luckily for Elvis, the paparazzi didn't want to camp out in humid Memphis). They don't drive up and down Elvis Presley Boulevard in a golf cart in their pajamas (LOL--his answer for that one to the police was that it was his boulevard). Elvis' best security was probably the gun behind his own belt buckle and the one on his leg (not to mention the fact that he was pretty physically strong and a genuine black belt--you can see him in the movies just picking people up and throwing them over his shoulder--he did most of his own stunts). And as far as fans go--half his concerts were practically a kissing orgy (Love Me Tender, in particular--some funny jokes in the mid-'70s if he had come down with something contagious and the fans would still be wanting to kiss him). He actually had to stop wearing the capes after '73 because he feared he'd get pulled right off stage and had to wear band-aids to keep the rings on when fans held onto his hand and wouldn't let go.

    One thing that Elvis definitely was better at than the Beatles was controlling fans (though he also had a really deep, powerful voice that could also get everyone's attention real quick--he controlled his audiences quite well). Whereas the Beatles really struggled with the way they had to deal with so many fans, Elvis seemed to go out of his way to do as much as possible to get close to them (and one of the things he missed in the '60s about not doing live performances was that he missed the fans and the energy of the live performance). Elvis' greatest strength was his live performances, whereas the Beatles were much more comfortable in the recording studio and were completely at a loss when it came to having to deal with screaming fans and never really were able to deal with it. Elvis seemed to get a kick out of the screaming girls and would sometimes holler back at them with a high voice saying his name (in fact, Lisa Marie took to mimicking them and would call her dad Elvis because that's what she heard all the fans outside saying, despite his insistence that he was "daddy"). Elvis wasn't particularly fond of recording studios (to the point of RCA putting recording equipment in his living room--that's the Jungle Room--to get him to actually record something because he was just doing concerts all the time).

    There is very minimal studio wankery on pretty much any '50s record, but Elvis' records are pretty much just a single performance, flaws and all, with a band in a room. Now, artists can't even sing live because everything on their records is fiddled with to death on a computer or put through synthesizers. You don't get a lot of artists nowadays that can sing better or the same live than they ever did in a studio--because in those cases, the voice on the record is pretty bare bones as it is and they weren't faking it. Granted, the height of record fiddling in the '50s was Sam Phillips' Sun Records slapback echo or RCA's recorded stairwell echo (because they couldn't figure out how Sam did it and came up with a new echo technique). That's why when you hear a lot of oldies artists or see them live, you really are seeing exactly the same artist that you hear on the record. That's a major rarity today. Nothing hasn't been cleaned up and polished to sterility on records nowadays. Back then, if the chair squeaked, it's right there in the record. Sometimes an instrument would be a guy hitting the back of a guitar case because they didn't have a drum. If someone breathed heavily on a record (among Elvis' technical faults, he is heard breathing, grunting, mumbling, yelling out and making all sorts of noises a lot--there's a rather vocally orgasmic version of My Babe out there), it's there forever. You don't get anything that raw now. When someone like Elvis chose between takes, he wasn't picking the most flawless, perfect, polished take, but the one that had the best feeling to it, even if it wasn't technically and soullessly perfect.

    One of the things that separated a lot of these blues/country/gospel/rock'n'roll singers was that they ended up toppling the New York big band/jazz snob types who would be sitting at music stands with orchestras and couldn't just randomly start breaking out into anything and jamming in a very raw, under-rehearsed way. Another thing that Elvis did was he didn't just sit or stand in the center of the stage--he put on a show and made sure he gave a show to every part of the audience no matter where they were. He was one of the first to really do that on a massive popular scale to the point where everyone else had to follow to remain relevant. Elvis' strength was always how to deal with fans and the live audience. He was pretty raw on stage and his joking on stage could be pretty random--you'd get the Elvis you'd expect if you were in his living room. I mean, the whole shaky-leg thing came from the fact that he was scared sh*tless at an early concert (also the fact that he just naturally kept time by tapping his foot) and the girls were all screaming because the wide-legged '50s pants were moving--and he had no idea why they were screaming until the guy backstage told him that whatever it was that he was doing, to go back and do it again. Every artist today is constantly just looking for a way to shock people and they intend to do so. That's the last thing Elvis was trying to do; if anything, he wanted to be more respected. He stumbled into the controversy, not really trying to shock people and thinking that he was doing nothing wrong, and all he wanted was to be respected as a singer (his heart all along was really with gospel and ballads). He'd have been happy as part of a gospel quartet. He was actually very shy and humble (even to the point of severe self-deprecation of his own abilities) and never lost that. You look at artists today and they're just trying to get attention and market themselves. Colonel Parker, the piece-of-shit guy who saw Elvis' death *at his funeral* as a money-making opportunity rather than the loss of a beloved icon, lives more than Elvis in today's media. I see that with a lot of the older oldies artists: they weren't all about shocking everyone, but just making damn fine music. "I just want to make people happy for that one hour it comes across" to quote Elvis about the message he wanted to send when he did Aloha for 1.4 billion people in 46 countries. That's how music used to be. It wasn't to make some big political statement, but to just make people happy, to move them emotionally, etc... Incidents like the one where a fan wrote a letter to Elvis, telling him that listening to How Great Thou Art had stopped her from committing suicide was the sort of thing that Elvis felt proud of. In those days, people saw themselves as entertainers that were just there to make people happy and make people's lives just that little bit better.

    There's also a beautiful story of a little girl who had lost her hair and had a hip and leg amputated and Elvis called her beautiful. The story can be found here: http://www.elvis-tkc.com/forum2/lofi...hp/t14893.html and here's a clip of Elvis backstage with her: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSwoLFk-Uf0.

    Denise Sanchez, an 8-year-old girl from Santa Fe, New Mexico, had been a huge Elvis Presley fan since she was four. After the Christmas holiday in 1971, Denise was diagnosed with cancer. She had to have her leg and part of her hip amputated when a large tumor was detected. A very short while later, the cancer spread to her lungs. Her doctors stopped the chemotherapy treatments she had been undergoing, stating that there was no more they could do for her. Several months later, Denise's mother, Trudi, found out that Elvis was performing in Albuquerque on April 19, 1972. Mrs. Sanchez was able to get two tickets to the show. Her daughter was thrilled. As the day of the concert neared, Denise suffered a relapse and was given the devastating news that she was too sick to travel the 65 miles to see Elvis. The young girl cried for several days and begged her mother to take her to the show. She wanted to see Elvis in person before she died. Finally, her mother and doctor agreed to let her go to the performance. Two days before the show, Mrs. Sanchez was advised to go to the newspapers and have them print a story on Denise. Trudi went to the Albuquerque Journal and spoke with a reporter named Grace Marie Prather, Prather helped Trudi and Denise set up a meeting with Colonel Parker in the early afternoon on the day of the show. They spoke to Parker at length about Denise's condition and her wish to see Elvis. Parker told the women that they should come to the Hilton Hotel at 4 p.m and he would see what he could do. Trudi brought her daughters, Denise and Paula, and her two best friends to the hotel at the appointed time. Prather also went along to document meeting. The Colonel instructed then to come to the show at 5 p.m Denise could meet Elvis after the concert. The entire group drove to the Tingley Coliseum and were seated in special box seats. Denise fidgeted throughout the entire show, anxious to meet her idol. During intermission the Sanchez party was invited backstage to Elvis's dressing room. Denise was scared, fearing Elvis's reaction to her missing leg and hip and to her bald head. Elvis took one look at the child and knelt down in front of her, kissing both her cheeks. He told Denise that she was beautiful. Trudi started crying. She could not believe how loving Elvis was to her daughter and saw how happy and alive he made her feel. Denise shyly unrolled a poster of the King and asked him to autograph it. Elvis signed it: "To Denise - Love you, Elvis Presley." Denise then asked him to sing her a song once he went back on stage. As the second part of the concert began, Elvis dedicated the first song, "You Gave Me a Mountain" to Denise. He explained to the audience, "This song if for a very special little girl I just met backstage, Denise." Denise was thrilled and cried through the entire song. When Denise got back home she told her mother under no circumstances was she going to clean her face and wash off Elvis's kisses. Three days later, Denise had still not washed her face. On the fourth day her mother finally forced her to clean her face. Elvis made little Denise's short life a happier one. His love for her helped her to feel better and eased her discomfort.
    And something even more tragic for me about Elvis' death is that at his funeral, a drunk driver crashed into 3 fans, killing 2 of them and mutilating the 3rd. It's just the saddest thing that could happen while mourning a man who loved his fans dearly (and he really meant it--it wasn't just lip-service--to him, a kid who had been as poor as he had been to the point of his dad being in the penitentiary for forging a $4 check for a hog to put food on the table during the Great Depression, the fans were what literally put the shirt on his back and made it so he didn't have to go back to driving a truck). Elvis knew that without the kindness of people, he'd have absolutely nothing. That's very crucial to understanding him. He started his musical career so his parents wouldn't have to work, that his mother would have a house and he could buy her a pink Cadillac. It wasn't because he wanted fame, to preach a political message or to shock people. He started his career to get his family out of abject poverty (the real Great Depression kind of poverty where you live in a 2-room shotgun shack near Shake Rag or in the projects). That's why when you read school alumni messages about Elvis, the stories they keep telling about him are things like donating their jacket because there was a kid at school who couldn't come to school in the winter if he didn't have a jacket--and that kid that received a donated jacket was Elvis. And from an early age, when he had absolutely NOTHING, he'd be giving away the few things he did have (he was doing that with toys as a child). That is why he just gave everything he had away as an adult to the point where, when he died, he had only $1,000 in savings, and the $2 million he had left (TOTAL) wouldn't be enough to keep Graceland running for a year (it was only opened as a museum to stop it from being sold to the city). And the money that he spent very rarely was all on him--it was always spent on others. A kid fan looking on from the gate as the Memphis Mafia were given motorcycles was just given an extra motorcycle. He gave fans the belts, capes and rings right off of him.

    I think why I'm such a big fan is that, while I've always enjoyed his music (I played general oldies non-stop as a kid and Elvis was always a favorite), it was between hearing those unknown big ballads and learning about the kind of man he was with fans and such that I went from just a casual liker of his music to an absolute fan of the man, the music and all of it. I mean, a lot of artists, I really don't want to know anything about them because it's just a disappointment when they end up just using their fans as a group to preach to because they think what they have to say is important beyond just entertaining them--I don't like that. Elvis is one of the few celebrities that, despite him being known on a first-name basis in every corner of the world (where literally his name might be one of the only things some know in English), comes off as someone who opened his heart up so much in his work that he very frequently shared with you exactly what he was feeling. A lot of his fans like that quality about him.

    Despite him not being a songwriter (though he did a lot of spur-of-the-moment lyric changes--a lot of joke lyrics--and came up with the titles/a few ideas for songs like If I Can Dream and That's Someone You'll Never Forget), the songs he chose can be eerily, EERILY keen about what he was going through personally (all the break-up songs in '72 being a prominent example of his life becoming his music). He could be amazingly raw and honest in live concerts when he was going through some very bad times in his life. There are some rather tragic stage comments out there. And equally, his joyful energy and humor also comes out in abundance. For someone who died so long ago, he left a lot that fans really start to believe they know the guy better than a lot of people they actually know, just because of the way he emoted and gave all these glimpses at a very human, flawed human being. He never wanted to just be a soulless image--he wanted to be seen as that human being who loved his family, friends and fans. Despite all his faults, flaws and failings (of which he had many), in a way, it just gave more material that humanizes him. Particularly for people who are fans of the '70s Elvis, the reason they love that period of his career so much is BECAUSE he was the god that fell to Earth and just became a person whose entire tragic life (a story of 'it's lonely at the top') became something he was living right out there in front of you: it was in his music, it was in his so very emotive voice and very often, that broken, lonely, sad man went out there to perform for his fans because he longed for love. Live performances truly became all about that in the end. For anyone who struggles with depression or whatnot, Elvis can be almost like a rich, warm, baritone blanket whose voice can express that. I mean, you can't escape the fact that he was crying out for help in the end (look up the 6/21/77 performance of Unchained Melody where his pained "I'll be coming home, wait for me" takes on a completely new meaning--his version is not a love song--it's one of desperation and knowing that he was about to die in 2 months). It wasn't about the lyrics or the songwriting for Elvis, because he could take a song and inject emotions and get an emotional response just by his delivery of it. The live and unofficial recordings experience gives you moments of honest, raw emotion like "Play around, you'll lose your wife. Already done that. Play too hard, you'll lose your life. Almost did that.", "I get carried away very easily... Emotional son of a bitch." and "...a song named Are You Lonesome Tonight? I am... and I was..." It's those little unscripted, raw moments that make me love him all the more (and it's just a joy to hear him laugh... and laugh... and laugh...). That's why I'm an Elvis fan. I became a fan in a very rough period in my teenage years and, at times, he really did help me get through a lot. That's been his legacy for a lot of fans who have cared about the human being, not the image, for over 50 years.

    R.I.P. This year is his 75th birthday and in 9 days it will be 33 years since he died. I was born way too late. It's amazing that tens of thousands people do the Candlelight Vigil every August 16. There were 75,000 people for the 30th anniversary! (Sadly, like at the funeral, a fan died--that one from heat exposure.) 70,000 were at the funeral procession (20,000 filed past the open casket)!


    Quote Originally Posted by CliCliR View Post
    I was at a Green Day concert recently. They sang the "na, na na" part in Hey Jude. The whole audience was singing along, and me in the very middle, crying my eyes out. It definitely made my life
    Speaking of which, here's Elvis doing a few Beatles songs and a few Beatles doing Elvis songs... And a few other duet/tribute goodies with other people.

    (Speaking of crying, there's nothing like a middle-of-the-night sob fest with a bunch of really beautiful, sad ballads. I've cried buckets listening to Elvis--his '70s work really touches me. For that matter, I can't get through an Elvis biography without being a wet mess by the end. I remember being at the library in college reading one and there I was sitting in the middle of the stacks on the floor bawling my eyes out over the anecdote about Lisa Marie stroking her father's hair as he lay in his casket. It always affects me. I like a good cry with my passions. I must say that the two things that affected me the most at the remarkably humble-sized Graceland--I went in 2005--was sitting in the trophy room surrounded by all of his majestic clothes and imagining him and when I was at the grave site in the Meditation Garden. Amazing.)

    Elvis doing a Yesterday/Hey, Jude medley live
    Elvis doing Yesterday, Yesterday from a different angle, Hey, Jude, Little Sister/Get Back and Something in a rehearsal jam session
    Elvis doing Something during the Aloha rehearsal concert, Something at Aloha, Something at a Vegas concert and Something yet again
    Elvis doing Little Sister/Get Back live
    Elvis doing Hey, Jude

    Paul playing on Bill Black's bass (Elvis' '50s bass player--Paul owns that bass today) doing Heartbreak Hotel
    The Beatles doing My Baby Left Me/That's All Right
    The Beatles doing That's All Right (note that this was Elvis' first record)

    Elvis and Frank Sinatra duetting Witchcraft/Love Me Tender and other parts of the show
    Johnny Cash imitating a rock'n'roll singer who is imitating Elvis and Elvis imitating Johnny
    Cash, Lewis, Perkins and Orbison's tribute to Elvis when he died on Johnny Cash's 1977 Christmas special
    Cash, Lewis, Perkins and Orbison's 1985 tribute song, We Remember the King, to Elvis--with Sam Phillips intro!
    Lisa Marie's songs, Nobody Noticed It and Lights Out, which are about/reference her father
    Elvis, Jerry Lee and Carl during the Million Dollar Quartet (December 4, 1956) at Sun Studios
    Elvis, Buddy Holly, Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins in Lubbock, TX in 1955

    A few posthumous duets:
    Elvis & Lisa Marie Presley doing Don't Cry Daddy and In The Ghetto (the latter was a Katrina benefit)--both featured during Elvis Week (2002 & 2007)
    Elvis & CÚline Dion doing If I Can Dream on American Idol
    Elvis & Martina McBride doing a Blue Christmas duet

    Here are a few pictures of me at Graceland & Sun Studios:
    Spoiler:







    Last edited by NileQT87; 08-08-10 at 03:23 AM.

    "If there is no great glorious end to all this, if nothing we do matters, then all that matters is what we do."
    "Nothing in the world is the way it ought to be. It's harsh and cruel. But that's why there's us. Champions."

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    Sunnydale High Student Ensign's Avatar
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    Someone on Facebook got me hooked on Within Temptation recently.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tni_c...feature=autofb

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    Why haven't I posted here yet?

    Well, I like way too much music

    Panic! At The Disco
    Linkin Park
    Bowling For Soup
    Coronas
    Elliot Minor
    Falloutboy
    Florence And The Machine
    The Fray
    Greenday
    James Morrison
    Jason Mraz
    Mumford And Sons
    My Chemical Romance
    Oasis
    Paramore
    Queen
    The Mission District
    The Kooks
    The Baseballs


    Actually, speaking of which, THE BASEBALLS ARE AWESOME!!!!!!!! They do rockabilly versions of modern songs including Bleeding Love, Umbrella, Love in this Club and many more awesome songs
    We're kissing the lips of strangers
    We're hugging whoever next we meet
    Oh life, I love you to my bones

    Buffy Forums Welcoming Committee.

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    Joan Jett/Joan Jett & the Blackhearts
    Vixen
    Lita Ford
    The Runaways
    Skid Row
    Poison
    Tegan & Sara
    The Donnas
    Within Temptation
    Paramore
    Aerosmith
    Heart


    That's probably the main ones you'll find my searching for on Pandora
    Last edited by Kiera; 26-09-10 at 03:02 AM.

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    Matchbox Twenty and Rob Thomas, Vertical Horizon, Matt Nathanson, Sister Hazel, Michelle Branch and The Wreckers, Avril Lavigne, Fleetwood Mac, the Dixie Chicks, Sheryl Crow....

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